vb.net free barcode dll $ lscc='ls *c' $ echo $lscc ls *c $ lscc=`ls *c` $ echo $lscc mainc progc in Software

Make Code 39 in Software $ lscc='ls *c' $ echo $lscc ls *c $ lscc=`ls *c` $ echo $lscc mainc progc

$ lscc='ls *c' $ echo $lscc ls *c $ lscc=`ls *c` $ echo $lscc mainc progc
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You can place shell commands within a file and then have the shell read and execute the commands in the file In this sense, the file functions as a shell program, executing shell commands as if they were statements in a program A file that contains shell commands is called a shell script You enter shell commands into a script file using a standard text editor such as the Vi editor The sh or command used with the script s filename will read the script file and execute the commands In the next example, the text file called lsc contains an ls command that displays only files with the extension c: lsc
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ls *c
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A run of the lsc script is shown here:
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$ sh lsc mainc calcc $ lsc mainc calcc
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You can dispense with the sh and commands by setting the executable permission of a script file When the script file is first created by your text editor, it is given only read and write permission The chmod command with the +x option will give the script file executable permission Once it is executable, entering the name of the script file at the shell prompt and pressing ENTER will execute the script file and the shell commands in it In effect, the script s filename becomes a new shell command In this way, you can use shell scripts to design and create your own Linux commands You need to set the permission only once In the next example, the lsc file s executable permission for the owner is set to on Then the lsc shell script is directly executed like any Linux command
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$ chmod u+x lsc $ lsc mainc calcc
PART II
You may have to specify that the script you are using is in your current working directory You do this by prefixing the script name with a period and slash combination, /, as in /lsc The period is a special character representing the name of your current working directory The slash is a directory pathname separator The following example shows how to execute the lsc script:
$ /lsc mainc calcc
Script Arguments
Just as any Linux command can take arguments, so also can a shell script Arguments on the command line are referenced sequentially starting with 1 An argument is referenced using the $ operator and the number of its position The first argument is referenced with $1, the second with $2, and so on In the next example, the lsext script prints out files with a specified extension The first argument is the extension The script is then executed with the argument c (of course, the executable permission must have been set) lsext
ls *$1
A run of the lsext script with an argument is shown here:
$ lsext c mainc calcc
In the next example, the commands to print out a file with line numbers have been placed in an executable file called lpnum, which takes a filename as its argument The cat
Part II:
The Linux Shell and File Structure
command with the -n option first outputs the contents of the file with line numbers Then this output is piped into the lpr command, which prints it The command to print out the line numbers is executed in the background lpnum
cat -n $1 | lpr &
A run of the lpnum script with an argument is shown here:
$ lpnum mydata
You may need to reference more than one argument at a time The number of arguments used may vary In lpnum, you may want to print out three files at one time and five files at some other time The $ operator with the asterisk, $*, references all the arguments on the command line Using $* enables you to create scripts that take a varying number of arguments In the next example, lpnum is rewritten using $* so that it can take a different number of arguments each time you use it: lpnum
cat -n $* | lpr &
A run of the lpnum script with multiple arguments is shown here:
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