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In the TCSH and C shells, an environment variable is defined using a separate definition command, setenv In this respect, an environment variable is really a very different type of variable from that of a regular local variable A C shell environment variable operates more like a global variable It can be directly referenced by any subshell This differs from the Bourne, BASH, and Korn shells in which only a copy of the environment variable is passed down and used by the subshell To define an environment variable you first enter the setenv command followed by the variable name and then the value There is no assignment operator In the next example, the myfile environment variable is defined and assigned the value List
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% setenv myfile list
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dispfile
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setenv myfile "List" echo "Displaying $myfile" cat -n $myfile printfile
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printfile
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echo "Printing $myfile" lpr $myfile &
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The run of the dispfile script is shown here:
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% dispfile Displaying List 1 screen 2 modem 3 paper Printing List $
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In the previous example, the variable myfile is defined as an environment variable in the dispfile script Notice the use of the setenv command instead of set The myfile variable can now be referenced in any subshell, such as that generated when printfile is executed When printfile is executed, it will be able to directly access the myfile variable defined in the shell of the dispfile script
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4:
The Shell Scripts and Programming
Control Structures
You can control the execution of Linux commands in a shell script with control structures Control structures allow you to repeat commands and to select certain commands over others A control structure consists of two major components: a test and commands If the test is successful, then the commands are executed In this way, you can use control structures to make decisions as to whether commands should be executed There are two different kinds of control structures: loops and conditions A loop repeats commands, whereas a condition executes a command when certain conditions are met The BASH shell has three loop control structures: while, for, and for-in There are two condition structures: if and case The control structures have as their test the execution of a Linux command All Linux commands return an exit status after they have finished executing If a command is successful, its exit status will be 0 If the command fails for any reason, its exit status will be a positive value referencing the type of failure that occurred The control structures check to see if the exit status of a Linux command is 0 or some other value In the case of the if and while structures, if the exit status is a 0 value, then the command was successful and the structure continues
PART II
Test Operations
With the test command, you can compare integers, compare strings, and even perform logical operations The command consists of the keyword test followed by the values being compared, separated by an option that specifies what kind of comparison is taking place The option can be thought of as the operator, but it is written, like other options, with a minus sign and letter codes For example, -eq is the option that represents the equality comparison However, there are two string operations that actually use an operator instead of an option When you compare two strings for equality, you use the equal sign (=) For inequality you use != Table 4-1 lists some of the commonly used options and operators used by test The syntax for the test command is shown here:
test value -option value test string = string
In the next example, the user compares two integer values to see if they are equal In this case, you need to use the equality option, -eq The exit status of the test command is examined to find out the result of the test operation The shell special variable $ holds the exit status of the most recently executed Linux command
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