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$ PATH=$PATH:$HOME/mybin: $ export PATH $ echo $PATH /bin:/usr/bin::/home/chris/mybin
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If you add a directory to PATH yourself while you are logged in, the directory will be added only for the duration of your login session When you log back in, the login initialization file, bash_profile, will again initialize your PATH with its original set of directories
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The bash_profile file is described in detail a bit later in this chapter To add a new directory to your PATH permanently, you need to edit your bash_profile file and find the assignment for the PATH variable Then, you simply insert the directory, preceded by a colon, into the set of pathnames assigned to PATH
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The BASH_ENV variable holds the name of the BASH shell initialization file to be executed whenever a BASH shell is generated For example, when a BASH shell script is executed, the BASH_ENV variable is checked and the name of the script that it holds is executed before the shell script The BASH_ENV variable usually holds $HOME/bashrc This is the bashrc file in the user s home directory (The bashrc file is discussed later in this chapter) You can specify a different file if you wish, using that instead of the bashrc file for BASH shell scripts
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Configuring the Shell Prompt
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The PS1 and PS2 variables contain the primary and secondary prompt symbols, respectively The primary prompt symbol for the BASH shell is a dollar sign ($) You can change the prompt symbol by assigning a new set of characters to the PS1 variable In the next example, the shell prompt is changed to the -> symbol:
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$ PS1= '->' -> export PS1 ->
You can change the prompt to be any set of characters, including a string, as shown in the next example:
$ PS1="Please enter a command: " Please enter a command: export PS1 Please enter a command: ls mydata /reports Please enter a command:
The PS2 variable holds the secondary prompt symbol, which is used for commands that take several lines to complete The default secondary prompt is > The added command lines begin with the secondary prompt instead of the primary prompt You can change the secondary prompt just as easily as the primary prompt, as shown here:
$ PS2="@"
Like the TCSH shell, the BASH shell provides you with a predefined set of codes you can use to configure your prompt With them you can make the time, your username, or your directory pathname a part of your prompt You can even have your prompt display the history event number of the current command you are about to enter Each code is preceded by a \ symbol: \w represents the current working directory, \t the time, and \u your username; \! will display the next history event number In the next example, the user adds the current working directory to the prompt:
$ PS1="\w $" /home/dylan $
Part II:
The Linux Shell and File Structure
The codes must be included within a quoted string If no quotes exist, the code characters are not evaluated and are themselves used as the prompt PS1=\w sets the prompt to the characters \w, not the working directory The next example incorporates both the time and the history event number with a new prompt:
$ PS1="\t \! ->"
The following table lists the codes for configuring your prompt:
Prompt Codes \! \$ \d \# \h \s \t \u \v \w \W \\ \n \[ \] \nnn Description Current history number Use $ as prompt for all users except the root user, which has the # as its prompt Current date History command number for just the current shell Hostname Shell type currently active Time of day in hours, minutes, and seconds Username Shell version Full pathname of the current working directory Name of the current working directory Displays a backslash character Inserts a newline Allows entry of terminal-specific display characters for features like color or bold font Character specified in octal format
The default BASH prompt is \s-\v\$ to display the type of shell, the shell version, and the $ symbol as the prompt Some distributions like Fedora and Red Hat have changed this to a more complex command consisting of the user, the hostname, and the name of the current working directory The actual operation is carried out in the /etc/bashrc file discussed in the later section The System /etc/ bashrc BASH Script and the /etc/profiled Directory A sample configuration is shown here The /etc/ bashrc file uses USER, HOSTNAME, and PWD environment variables to set these values A simple equivalent is show here with an @ sign in the hostname and a $ for the final prompt symbol The home directory is represented with a tilde (~)
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