rdlc barcode The plus operator (+) in the preceding example performs a concatenation of the strings in Visual C#

Maker UCC - 12 in Visual C# The plus operator (+) in the preceding example performs a concatenation of the strings

The plus operator (+) in the preceding example performs a concatenation of the strings
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Reference-Type Variables
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Reference-type variables are variables that are used to get access to objects that are used by the C# language The reference variables are so called because they are made up of two parts: the reference and the object that the variable references We must explore how memory is used before we can get into the details of how the reference variable is constructed, so the next section will do just that
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Memory and Variables
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The first thing we need to look at when exploring variables is the memory subsystem used by the Common Language Runtime Memory is assigned to the running program in essentially three areas: stack, static, and heap You can see the three areas in Figure 2-1 The heap is all the remaining memory after the stack and static memory has been defined For the purposes of this chapter, we will only look at the stack
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2: Variables and Program Structure
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Figure 2-1 The parts of CLR memory
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PART I
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The stack is an area of memory that works something like a pile of pancakes: you add pancakes to the top, and you remove them from the top (this is known as last in first out, or LIFO) The heap and static memory is where variables and methods that must be available even if they are out of scope (not visible from the current location) are stored For example, the Main() method is the entry point to your application, so it must be in the static area so it can be called, even if the class has not been created yet When you create variables, they are created in memory in one of two ways, depending on whether the variable is a value type or a reference type In the following sections, we will look at how memory is assigned when variables are declared and used
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In C# all variables must be declared before they are used In the declaration you must specify a data type and a name for the variable so that memory can be set aside for the variable An optional initial value can be included with the declaration if you know what the value should be to start The syntax for variable declaration is as follows:
[scope] <data type> <variable name> [= initial value];
The scope determines the accessibility of the variable (public, local, private), and the default is private The data type specifies what kind of data the variable will hold Optionally the variable can be initialized to a specific value All variables must be initialized (given a value) before they are used in any calculation If the variables are not initialized, the compilation of the program will fail The following lines declare two integer (int) variables: foo and bar foo is assigned the initial value 42:
int foo = 42; int bar;
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The variable declaration can contain calculations, as in the following:
int foo = 42; int bar = 12; int foobar = foo + bar;
The following code segment will not compile because the variable bar is used before it is initialized:
int foo = 42; int bar; int foobar = foo + bar;
In order to declare a reference-type variable, the same syntax is used:
string strMimico; City objToronto = null; object objGeneric;
The preceding lines create reference variables for a string, City, and object, respectively We will now look at how the declaration affects memory allocation
Value-Type Variables on the Stack
Value-type variables are also known as stack variables because they are stored on the stack Figure 2-2 shows the result of the following declarations
Int x; Int y = 42; Float f = 314159
As the variables go out of scope, they are removed from the stack, ensuring the proper destruction of the variables As the variables are created on the stack, they are not initialized that is the responsibility of the program The use of an uninitialized variable will result in a compiler error
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