source code to generate barcode in vb.net 2: Variables and Program Structure in C#

Printer UPC Symbol in C# 2: Variables and Program Structure

2: Variables and Program Structure
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Table 2-4 List of Escape Sequence Characters
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Escape Sequence Character Character Name
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PART I
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\' \" \\ \0 \a \b \f \n \r \t \v
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Single quote Double quote Backslash Null Alert Backspace Form feed Newline Carriage return Horizontal tab Vertical tab
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String literals By placing text within double quotes ("text"), you create a string literal You can embed any escape sequences inside the quotes and they will be treated according to their function For example, consider this line: string MyString = "This is a \t test"; This example will produce a line of output with a tab character between the words a and test If you want to eliminate that behavior, you can create a verbatim string literal by placing an at character (@) before the first double quotes Here s the previous example modified to create a verbatim string literal @string MyString = "This is a \t test"; This line results in the \t being treated as part of the text The output from this line of code would be this: This is a \t test Null literal In order to represent a null value, you simply type the word null This is considered to be the null literal
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Operators
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This section will deal with a few features unique to C# operators We assume that you are familiar with C++ or Java operators and do not need a lesson in how to use them If this is not the case, we suggest looking at the online documentation found in Visual Studio NET and reviewing how these operators work Table 2-5 lists the C# operators in order of their precedence
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Assignment Operator vs Comparison Operator
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Like the Java compiler, the C# compiler catches an error that has long caused debugging nightmares for C and C++ programmers Have a look at the following code:
if (i = 42)
MCAD/MCSD Visual C# NET Certification All-in-One Exam Guide
Type of Operator Description Operator
Primary
Unary
Arithmetic Shift Relational
Member access Post-increment Post-decrement Constructor Type Size Overflow control Positive Negative Not Bitwise complement Pre-increment Pre-decrement Type cast Standard Left Right Less than Greater than Type equality Equals Not equals And Exclusive or Or And Or Conditional Assignment
Equality Logical bitwise
Logical Ternary Assignment Combination Table 2-5
objectmember identifier++ identifier -new typeof sizeof checked unchecked + ! ~ ++identifier --identifier (newtype) identifier * / % + << >> < or <= > or >= is == != & ^ | && || : = *= /= %= += -= <<= >>= &= ^= |=
List of C# Operators and Order of Precedence
Under the rules of C and C++ programming, this is a legitimate piece of code The statement means that after you assign the value of 42 to the variable, the result is checked for a Boolean true or false value The end result is that if the assignment was successful, the condition returns a true, which, of course, always happens
2: Variables and Program Structure
If the test was really meant to be against the actual value of the variable, it should have been coded as follows:
if (i == 42)
PART I
Now the desired outcome will be achieved The program will test whether the variable equals 42, and only if this is true will it execute the next code block The type safety rules of the C# programming language do not allow for this implicit conversion to a Boolean value, and, therefore, the compiler will not allow this code segment:
if ( i = 42 )
Operator Shorthand
The C programming language introduced a method of writing code that was short and to the point One of the techniques employed that can sometimes be confusing to the new programmer is the use of operator shorthand Examine this very simple line of code:
y = y + 42;
This line causes the literal 42 to be added to the value of y, and the result to be assigned to the variable y The shorthand version for this is as follows:
y += 42;
This means exactly the same thing as the previous line This shorthand technique can be used in many ways, such as the following:
y -= 42; y *= 42; // subtract 42 from y, then assign the result to y // multiply y by 42, then assign the result to y
Any of the arithmetic or bitwise operators can be used this way The other shortcut operators are called increment and decrement operators (++ and --) These are very common and useful shortcuts, but they take some practice and knowledge of the operator precedence table to use properly Instead of coding this operation:
y = y + 1;
You can simply code it as either y++ or ++y The same is true for this operation:
y = y - 1;
It can be coded as either y-- or --y You may be wondering at this point what determines whether the operator is at the end (postfix) or the beginning (prefix) Good question! The answer lies in the order of evaluating an expression Consider this piece of code:
newValue = oldValue++;
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