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Interestingly enough, no special naming convention is needed to define an array An array is generally a simple data structure in which a group of values or objects can be accessed using the same name but using indexes to access each individual element If you ve looked at VBScript code, you have undoubtedly seen something similar to this:
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Dim myArr(2) myArr(0) = "first" myArr(1) = "second" myArr(2) = "third" WScriptEcho myArr(1)
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This isn t a VBScript tutorial, so we won t go into this example in great detail; basically, this code defines an array containing three elements (even though there s a 2 in the parentheses since the 2 signifies the index of the last element starting from 0) You then assign values to each element and then output the value of myArr at index 1, which in this case would be the string second The following code snippet shows how arrays are dealt with in Windows PowerShell:
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$myArr = "first","second","third" $myArr[1] = "2nd" write-host $myArr
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The result of this little code snippet above would be first 2nd third being displayed on the screen on one line Just like many programming languages, the arrays are 0 index based, so $myArr[0] refers to the first element, $myArr[1] refers to the second element, and so on Notice how you implicitly defined $myArr as having three data elements; but what if you wanted to add two more In VBScript, you would have had to use the ReDim statement to resize the array But in PowerShell, this is extremely easy:
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$myArr = "first","second","third" $myArr = $myArr + "fourth","fifth" write-host $myArr[4]
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This code snippet results in the string fifth being displayed on the screen Notice that all you had to do to extend my existing array was to add the new data elements you wanted using the plus (+) operator Windows PowerShell automatically handles the memory allocation for me
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One of the most important features needed in any scripting environment is the ability to define conditional statements such as if x equal 2 then do this otherwise do something else After all, without conditional statements such as If/ElseIf/Else combinations, you can t really implement any kind of logic in your script The key to being able to create branches in your code is to combine conditional statements with comparison operators to make decisions based on values of variables within your script Here s an example:
$a = 5 if ($a -eq 1) { write-host "One" } elseif ($a -eq 2) { write-host "Two" } else { write-host "Anything but One or Two!" }
Hopefully you can follow this slightly longer code snippet First, you assign the value of 5 to $a Then check if the value of $a is equal to 1 and, if it is, you output One to the screen If $a is not equal to 1, check whether it is equal to 2 and output Two if it is If neither condition is met, the string Anything but One or Two! is displayed Based on the value of $a being 5, this script will output Anything but One or Two! Try changing the value of $a to a different number to see the output
13:
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In the preceding example, we have used the -eq comparison operator to check whether the variable equaled a certain value You can use seven different comparison operators in Windows PowerShell, and each starts with a hyphen (-) followed by a twoletter abbreviation of the comparison it performs: -eq Equal to -ne Not equal to -notmatch Does not match -gt Greater than -ge Greater than or equal to -lt Less than -le Less than or equal to Another method for performing a conditional branching within your code is through the use of a Switch statement A Switch statement is a more efficient way of handling situations in which you want to test more than two conditions with an If/Elseif statement For example, let s say you have a variable that can contain the name of one of seven different colors Red, Blue, Yellow, White, Green, Orange, Black and you want to perform different actions based on each individual color If you could only use If/ Elseif statements, it would take many such statements and would not be easy to read later Using a Switch statement makes the code much neater and intuitive, as in this example:
$color = "blue" switch ($color) { red {write-host "Color Red"; break} blue {write-host "Color Blue"; break} yellow {write-host "Color Yellow"; break} white {write-host "Color White"; break} green {write-host "Color Green"; break} orange {write-host "Color Orange"; break} black {write-host "Color Black"; break} }
Notice how easy it is to see which code gets executed based on the value of $color What you haven t seen before is the break statement We ll discuss this in the next section, but essentially it tells Windows PowerShell to stop processing the rest of the potential switch conditions, which makes sense since we ve already found a match
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