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The same approaches as the PC, but with an administration focus Desktop design Local versus central desktop control Desktop content Common shortcuts Common menus and Quick Launch areas
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Workflow technologies
Shared conferencing
Internet browser
Multicast technology
Group and individual agenda scheduling
Security
Non-repudiation technologies Ownership of IT assets
Internal and external access control User profiles Group Policy
Data encryption
Full volume encryption Group management
Confidential storage single, unified tree structure Centralized access management
Access rights and privileges
Storage
Data recovery practices and technologies Physical components Storage software
File structure File services
Unified storage Indexing services Databases
Data replication technologies temporary data storage Transaction services
Networking
Legacy system access Unique networking protocol Task scheduling Operating system
Remote access and Virtual Private Networking LDAP directory structures
Remote object management Unique object naming structure
Message queuing Unique scripting approach Certified scripts
Operating System
Event management Service Packs Hot Fixes Manufacturercertified drivers Dynamic Link Libraries (DLLs) Corporate-wide operating system complements
Physical
Computers DMTF Standards Servers Cabling Printers Scanners
Maximum hard disk storage All other hardware components of the IT infrastructure 2002-2007, Resolutions Enterprises
FIGURE 3-4
The nine layers of the PASS model apply to both PCs and servers
3:
Plan for Windows Server 2008
Role-based commercial applications Components that are installed on a server and are available to all users of the server Ad hoc commercial applications Commercial components that are installed on few servers, regardless of their role Role-based corporate applications Components that are installed on a server, but whose access is restricted to specific and authorized users Ad hoc corporate applications Corporate components that are installed on few servers, regardless of their role At the core of this model is the concept of standardization, specifically within the physical and server kernel sections the kernel being the component that you install as the core for every server Standardization does not mean reduction in quality; it simply means doing everything in a single, unified manner This alone can vastly reduce costs in the IT enterprise The PASS model clearly displays the mechanisms that can be used to construct servers, so long as standards are available to support all of the processes that it identifies (see Figure 3-5)
PART II
The Benefits of the PASS Model
Using a single model for the outline of technical services provided by both PCs and servers has several major advantages First, by using specific sections and purposely including a presentation section, it forms the framework for user and technology interactions within a
FIGURE 3-5
The point of access to secure services, or PASS, model
Part II:
Plan and Prepare
Windows-based distributed environment Second, it outlines that there should be no difference in the approaches used to manage and maintain PASS objects (PCs or servers) Third, it describes how to construct both servers and PCs Fourth, it uses a framework that will allow the systems either physical or virtual to evolve with time through structured management approaches In addition, each of the six major sections of this model provides specific benefits Standardizing the physical section ensures that the organization has modern tools to perform its IT tasks It also ensures the control of obsolescence within the organization In addition, reducing the diversity of hardware within the organization reduces costs, since fewer device drivers need to be maintained for each type of peripheral With Windows Server 2008, you ll even want to aim for the inclusion of peripherals that can all be certified: ie, that come with and include device drivers that are digitally signed by the manufacturer, guaranteeing their stability In fact, for 64-bit systems, all drivers have to be certified; as a result, it is good practice to apply the rule to all server models if you can When stability is the top priority, reducing the number of potential problem sources is critical The physical section should always be based on industry standards, such as those outlined by the Desktop Management Task Force (DMTF) More information on the DMTF and the standards they promote can be found at wwwdmtforg
NOTE If you opt to move to a virtualized datacenter, then all server hardware will be 64-bit and all
server components will be certified This will ensure that the virtual instances of the OS you run on top of these physical boxes will not suffer failures due to non-standard and uncertified components The PASS system kernel is the section that will save the organization the most, because it provides the framework for the integration of common PASS services into a single unit This means that the organization must begin by devising the technical content of each of the kernel s sub-layers, the rules and guidelines governing them and their personalization or interaction with other sub-layers This information can then be used to interactively create reference systems that will serve as sources for the automated installation of all servers in the network Using new system imaging or Windows deployment technologies, the complete kernel can be captured into a single installation phase This system image can then be deployed to every single physical server within the network and provide a single unified standard This is in direct correlation with the new imaged-based setup (IBS) WS08 and Vista support In addition, having a core system image will greatly facilitate server provisioning and server restoration in case of failures For virtual server offerings, this standard image is much more easily captured, since it only requires you to make a duplicate of the disk files that make up the server and then spawn other servers from this copy But automation is not the only requirement Planning is essential, since the new system will be made available to all users Here the organization will need to identify the specific content of each sub-layer using the guidelines described previously Only organizationwide software components will be included in the sever kernel At this stage, it will also be vital to properly preconfigure the presentation section for the reference system that serves as the source device before reproduction The system kernel includes the presentation sub-layer If IT is a service, then this is the most important section of the entire kernel It is the one single aspect of the system that users and administrators will interact with on a daily basis Presentation does not stop at the desktop Every element users can see on a system should be standardized The organization
3:
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