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Appendix B
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System Gain
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System gain is the total gain of the radio system without considering antennas and cables System gain = Tx power Rx (threshold) sensitivity
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Free Space Loss
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[dB]
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Free-space path loss is the signal energy lost in traversing a path in free space only, with no other obstructions or propagation issues FSPL = 966 + 20log10 (dmiles) + 20log10 (fGHz) FSPL = 924 + 20log10 (dkm) + 20log10 (fGHz)
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Parabolic Antenna Directive Gain
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Ga = 10 log where Ga = antenna directive gain
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4 Aa [dBi] 2
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= aperture efficiency (usually 55%)
Aa = antenna aperture area
= wavelength
Appendix
Useful Physical Quantities and Units of Measurement
About Units of Measurements
Readers of this book will notice the use of different units of measurement throughout the text; the main reason for that is the fact that the world today is a mixture of different units of measurement So, formulas developed in North America use different units of measurement than those developed by the ITU All this requires us to pay close attention to what units are used where and to make sure that the units are consistent in our calculations North Americans probably use a greater variety of units of measurement than anyone else in the world Caught in a slow-moving transition from customary to metric units, the US uses a fascinating and sometimes frustrating mixture of units to refer to the same things We measure the length of a race in meters, but the length of the long jump event in feet and inches We speak of an engine s power in horsepower and its displacement in liters In the same dispatch, we describe a hurricane s wind speed in knots and its central pressure in millibars Furthermore, English customary units do not form a consistent system, either; reflecting their diverse roots in Celtic, Roman, Saxon, and Norse cultures, they too are often confusing and contradictory There are two systems for land measurement (one based on the yard and the other on the rod) and a third system for distances at sea There are two
Appendix C
systems (avoirdupois and troy) for small weights and two more (based on the long and short tons) for large weights North Americans use two systems for volumes (one for dry commodities and one for liquids) and the British use a third (the British Imperial Measure) Meanwhile, not too many people know that the legal definitions of the English customary units are actually based on metric units The U S and British governments have agreed that a yard equals exactly 09144 meter and an avoirdupois pound equals exactly 045359237 kilograms In this way, all the units of measurement North Americans use everyday are based on the standards of the metric system Since 1875, in fact, the United States has subscribed to the International System of Weights and Measures, the official version of the metric system All systems of weights and measures, metric and nonmetric, are linked through a network of international agreements supporting the International System of Units, called the SI, which comes from the first two initials of its French name, Syst me International d Unit s (ITU-R Recommendation V430-3: Use of the International System of Units (SI) ) The key agreement is the Treaty of the Meter (Convention du M tre), signed in Paris on May 20, 1875 Forty-eight nations have now signed this treaty, including all the major industrialized countries The SI is maintained by a small agency in Paris, the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM, for Bureau International des Poids et Mesures) It is updated every few years by an international conference, the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM, for Conf rence G n rale des Poids et Mesures), attended by representatives of all the industrial countries and international scientific and engineering organizations At the heart of the SI is a short list of base units defined in an absolute way without referring to any other units The base units are consistent with the part of the metric system called the MKS system
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