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The mesh topology is a mixture of the previously described configurations and is currently employed to improve the availability to the network (see Figure 47) This configuration is not really a cost-effective solution,
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Figure 47 Mesh topology
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so it is somewhat rare Furthermore, the traffic distribution presents more complexity in the physical layer Other configurations normally exhibit equivalent reliability at lower cost
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447 TDMA Transmission Network Optimization
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The main purpose for having digital access cross-connects (DACS) in the transmission network is grooming functionality This way, operators can efficiently fill or groom DS0s into the T1/E1 circuit and thereby optimize the use of the network links When the physical capacity on the radio hop is not fully utilized by the existing service, it might be a better solution to install a DACS and add new traffic over the same T1/E1 circuit rather than upgrading the radio When upgrading the radio, a new frequency plan, new link budget, and new interference calculations have to be made In addition, for high-priority circuits, the digital access cross-connect can automatically reroute the traffic in a ring/meshed network if a fault in the primary path occurs A word of caution: Although efficient circuit utilization in a TDMA network is a good thing, and many telecom and wireless operators prefer this solution to network upgrades, it may not leave room for future changes In other words, if original voice services required 15 DS0s and the other 9 DS0s were left for future expansion, it may not be such a good idea to use them for something else (for example, to overlay data) If you do so, an increase in voice traffic may later create a problem Overlaying a new network over the existing network without adding any new transmission capacity may prove to be a dangerous thing Perhaps building a new network now can save lots of time, effort, and money later For detailed information on planning transmission networks see Reference 6
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448 Over-Subscription
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In TDMA systems traffic is always deterministic, and so 2 T1s/E1s + 3 T1s/E1s is always equal to 5 T1s/E1s; this is not necessarily so in packet-based networks In the case of, for example, WiMAX networks, operators can decide to over-subscribe the total network capacity in order to improve overall network utilization and cost per line Over-subscription, sometimes called over-booking, in simplest terms means taking advantage of the fact that, for many systems, absolute peak demand on shared resources rarely occur You can see examples of over-subscription everywhere around us; airlines aggressively over-subscribe their seat capacity and public telephone networks over-subscribe
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Planning the Microwave Network
their network switching capacity, relying on the assumption that all the users will never be on the phone at the same time The point of over-subscription is that system capacity requirements can be significantly reduced if the requirement to handle absolute worst-case scenarios is ignored Of course, depending on the nature of the traffic, and how aggressively the resource is over-subscribed, there can be exceptional periods where there is more demand than can be served8 There are two basic scenarios where operators can choose to oversubscribe one or more service flow s guaranteed bandwidth, or they might choose to over-subscribe their nonguaranteed bandwidth Generally, over-subscription of guaranteed bandwidth is a practice that operators approach with caution since their customers naturally expect that their service agreements will be honored always Over-subscription of nonguaranteed bandwidth is less risky, but an operator must still balance their users service level expectations against the degree of over-subscription of the network capacity Operators will have to determine the extent to which they should oversubscribe their networks If users are told that they can expect up to some peak level of service but discover that during busy hours they can only get a small percentage of that service, they will likely be dissatisfied with their service Marketing departments usually label this as a typical level of service These calculations may affect the required bandwidth for each individual cell site as well as impact the capacity of the entire backhaul network Typical oversubscription rates can be different for residential service and for business service 45 References
1 Timiri, S, RF Interference Analysis for Collocated Systems, Microwave Journal, January 1997 2 Bates, J, Optimizing Voice in ATM/IP Mobile Networks, New York: McGraw-Hill, 2002 3 Lehpamer, H, Transmission Systems Design Handbook for Wireless Networks, Norwood, MA: Artech House, 2002 4 Jun-Seok Hwang et al, 4G Mobile Networks-Technology beyond 25 and 3G, Seoul National University Republic of Korea, PTC 2007 Proceedings, 2007 5 Jiangzhou Wang, High-Speed Wireless Communications-Ultra-wideband, 3G Long-Term Evolution, and 4G Mobile Systems, Cambridge University Press, 2008 6 A Krendzel et al, Radio Access Network Topology Planning for the 4G Networks, Tampere University of Technology, Institute of Communication Engineering, Finland, 2004 7 ITU-T G803, Architecture of Transport Networks Based on the Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH), 03/2000 8 SR Telecom, WiMAX Capacity, White Paper, 2006
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