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CHAPTER 16 Windows in Detail
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icrosoft Windows 2000 and XP are stable, high-performance operating systems (OSs) that offer scalability and, above all else, security Windows 2000 and Windows XP share the same core structure, files, and features, so the discussion that follows applies to both OSs Both are covered in detail followed by a discussion of the differences between the two OSs
OS Organization
Three terms best describe Windows 2000/XP organization: robust, scalable, and cross-platform Microsoft takes an object-oriented approach to the OS, separating it into three distinct parts: the drivers, the NT Executive, and the subsystems (Figure 1627)
FIGURE 1627
Windows NT organization
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The NT Executive is the core power of the Windows 2000/XP OS, handling all of the memory management and multitasking The NT Executive uses a hardware abstraction layer (HAL) to separate the system-specific device drivers from the rest of the OS (Figure 1628) Windows 2000/XP s robustness comes from the separation of running processes into a myriad of subsystems Each of these subsystems supports different types of applications in separate areas; that way, if one program locks up, it won t cause the entire system to lock up Windows supports DOS and older programs designed for earlier versions of Windows, as well as current Windows applications, via these numerous subsystems (Figure 1629) Windows 2000/XP s scalability makes them the only modern Microsoft OSs to support symmetric multiprocessing (SMP), providing support for systems with up to 32 CPUs The server versions of Windows go beyond SMP by adding the power of clustering, enabling multiple computers to share redundant data for ultimate protection If one system goes down, the other systems continue to run
NT File System (NTFS)
From the beginning, Microsoft designed and optimized every aspect of Windows 2000/XP for multi-user, networked environments Whereas all previous Microsoft OSs used either FAT16 or FAT32, Windows 2000 and XP use a far more powerful and robust file system, appropriately called NT File System (NTFS)
FIGURE 1628
NT Executive and the HAL
CHAPTER 16 Windows in Detail
FIGURE 1629
NT Executive can handle a lot of different OSs
8 contains a good basic description of NTFS, but let s go into a bit more detail NTFS offers the following excellent features:
Long filenames (LFNs) Redundancy Backward compatibility Recoverability Security
Long Filenames
NTFS supported LFNs long before FAT32 even existed NTFS filenames can be up to 255 characters
Redundancy
NTFS has an advanced FAT called the master file table (MFT) An NTFS partition keeps a backup copy of the most critical parts of the MFT in the middle of the disk, reducing the chances that a serious drive error can wipe out both the MFT and the MFT copy Whenever you defrag an NTFS partition, you ll see a small, immovable chunk in the middle of the drive; that s the backup MFT
Backward Compatibility
For all its power, NTFS is amazingly backward compatible You can copy DOS or Windows 9x/Me programs to an NTFS partition Windows will even keep the LFNs
Recoverability
Accidental system shutdowns, reboots, and lockups in the midst of a file save or retrieval wreak havoc on most systems NTFS avoids this with transaction
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logging Transaction logging identifies incomplete file transactions and restores the file to the original format automatically and invisibly
Security
NTFS truly shines with its powerful security functions When most people hear the term security, they tend to think about networks, and NTFS security works perfectly in a networked environment, but it works equally well on single systems that support multiple users Let s look at three major features of NTFS security: accounts, groups, and permissions Accounts To use a Windows 2000/XP system, you must have a valid account (and, frequently, a password) Without an account, you cannot use the system (Figure 1630) Every Windows 2000/XP system has a super account called administrator Remember when you saw the installation of Windows and it prompted you for a password for the administrator account As you might imagine, this account has access to everything a dangerous thing in the wrong hands! Groups The administrator creates user accounts with a special program called Users and Passwords in Windows 2000 (Figure 1631) and User Accounts in Windows XP Note that the account list has three columns: User Name, Domain, and Group To understand domains requires an extensive networking discussion, so we ll leave that for 18 We ll instead focus here on user names and groups A user name defines an account for a person who has access to the PC A group is simply a collection of accounts that share the same access capabilities A single account can be a member of multiple groups
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