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Every UART in a system is assigned a COM port value An internal modem snaps right into your expansion bus, so every internal modem has a built-in UART Therefore, even though a modem doesn t have a physical serial connection, it most certainly has a serial port a built-in one
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If you need a serial port to support some older device but have a motherboard that doesn't have one, don't fret You can always get a PCI expansion card with classic, 9-pin serial ports
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You should be familiar with the concept of USB, USB connectors, and USB hubs from the discussion of those concepts in 2, The Visible PC Here s a more in-depth look at USB and some of the issues involved with using USB devices
Understanding USB
The cornerstone of a USB connection is the USB host controller , an integrated circuit that is usually built into the chipset, which controls every USB device that connects to it Inside the host controller is a USB root hub the
Mike Meyers CompTIA A+ Guide: Essentials (Exam 220-601)
part of the host controller that makes the physical connection to the USB ports Every USB root hub is really just a bus similar in many ways to an expansion bus Figure 144 shows a diagram of the relationship between the host controller, root hub, and USB ports No rule says how many USB ports a single host adapter may use Early USB host adapters had two USB ports The most recent ones support up to ten Even if a host adapter supports a certain number of ports, there s no guarantee that the motherboard Figure 144 Host controller, root hub, and USB ports maker will supply that many ports To give a common example, a host adapter might support eight ports while the motherboard maker only supplies four adapters The most important point to remember about this is that every USB device connected to a single host adapter/root hub shares that USB bus with every other device connected to it The more devices you place on a single host adapter, the more the total USB bus slows down and the more power they use These issues are two of the biggest headaches that take place with USB devices in the real world USB devices, like any electrical device, need power to run, but not all take care of their own power needs A powered USB device comes with its own electrical cord that is usually connected in turn to an AC adapter Bus-powered USB devices take power from the USB bus itself; they don t bring any AC or DC power with them When too many bus-powered devices take too much power from the USB bus, bad things happen devices that work only some of the time and devices that lock up You ll also often get a simple message from Windows saying that the hub power has been exceeded and it just won t work Every USB device is designed to run at one of three different speeds The first USB standard, version 11, defined two speeds: Low-Speed USB , running at a maximum of 15 Mbps (plenty for keyboards and mice), and Full-Speed USB , running up to 12 Mbps Later, the USB 20 standard introduced Hi-Speed USB running at a whopping 480 Mbps The industry sometimes refers to Low-Speed and Full-Speed USB as USB 11 and Hi-Speed as USB 20, respectively In addition to a much faster transfer rate, Hi-Speed USB is fully backward compatible with devices that operate under the slower USB standards Those old devices won t run any faster than they used to, however To take advantage of the fastest USB speed, you must connect Hi-Speed USB devices to Hi-Speed USB ports using Hi-Speed USB cables Hi-Speed USB devices will function when plugged into Full-Speed USB ports, but they will run at only 12 Mbps While backward compatibility at least allows you to use the newer USB device with an older port, a quick bit of math will tell you
USB 20 defined more than just a new speed Many Low-Speed and Full-Speed USB devices are also under the USB 20 standard
The USB Implementers Forum (USB-IF) does not officially use Low-Speed and Full-Speed to describe 15-Mbps and 12-Mbps devices, calling both of them simply USB On the CompTIA A+ certification exams, however, you'll see the marketplacestandard nomenclature
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