Encapsulated Tags in Software

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Encapsulated Tags
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RFID inlays are sometimes encapsulated inside a hard case The case is made of RF translucent materials such as PET, Polypropylene (PP), Polyacetate (POM), Polycarbonate (PC), Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS), Polyamide 66P (A66), and Elastom re (EPDM) Tags are encapsulated to protect them from harsh environments For example, a tag attached to a reusable plastic container (RPC) used in a food processing plant would encounter high temperature, pressure, and steam when the container is sanitized These tags are used to track totes, carriers, and pallets in closed-loop systems and returnable assets in the supply chain Some of the cases may provide a more rugged method of tag attachment, such as bolting or riveting to the object In addition, the size and shape of the case may be designed to provide isolation from the object so the tag may be attached to metal objects Figure 3-5 shows some samples of encapsulated tags
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RF translucent material A material that allows RF waves to pass through it with almost negligible attenuation
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FIGURE 35
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Encapsulated tags
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Know that encapsulated tags are frequently used for tracking reusable containers in manufacturing and supply chains
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Tag Types
FID tags come in many different designs, shapes, and sizes A tag is designed for a particular application or a set of applications Depending on the object or material to which the tag is to be attached, it may require different frequency of operation or functionality The read range of a tag also varies with the frequency of operation The tag, being an electronic device, needs power to operate, and tag design dictates the source of this power The tag memory may have restriction on how often it can be written to This may be for security reasons, so that the data, once written, cannot be changed Some applications may require tags to be of a certain size for example, a laundry tag embedded inside a garment should be no bigger than a button A tag embedded inside a tire must be designed to withstand high temperatures and pressure encountered during the manufacturing of the tire A tag mounted on a metal object requires special design and mounting considerations Tags may be classified under four categories, depending on how the tags obtain power, the frequency at which they operate, the protocol used, and the various functionalities implemented on the tags
CHAPTER 3 Tag Knowledge
Power Source
A tag requires power to process signals received from the interrogator and to send the data encoded signals back to the interrogator Signals sent back may be reflected signals or signals generated by the tag Depending on how tags obtain the power and how they use that power, tags are classified as the following:
Passive tags Semi-passive tags Active tags
Passive Tags
A passive tag (Figure 3-6) does not have its own power source; it has no battery on-board The tag obtains power from radio waves received from the interrogator The amount of power thus received is very small, just enough to energize its IC Therefore, passive tag functionalities are limited Due to a lack of enough power, it cannot support an active transmitter to communicate with the interrogator The good thing about the lack of transmitter, however, is that passive tags do not contribute to radio noise To communicate with the interrogator, passive tags operating at low and high frequencies use inductive coupling, while those operating above a high frequency range use radiative coupling (See 2 for more about these coupling methods) Inductively coupled tags have a read range of a few inches to about 2 feet, while radiatively coupled tags have read range of up to 20 feet
FIGURE 36
Passive tags
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When a passive tag is not in an interrogation zone (IZ), which is the case most of the time, it has no power and does nothing Due to this, the passive tag cannot contain any kind of sensors that require continuous power, such as temperature and pressure sensors The passive tag typically has a minimum functionality of carrying and transmitting a small amount of data It is a simple and inexpensive device compared to active and semi-passive tags In RFID applications, passive RFID tags are often used Because of their low cost, passive tags are well suited in applications for which tags are not reusable The tags become part of the object to which they are attached and have the same lifecycle as the object itself; they are not returned into circulation after the object s life has expired For example, in a supply chain, a case of goods may have passive tags attached to it; when the items are removed from the case and the case is discarded, the tags are also discarded This makes economic sense due to the low cost of the passive tag The following table lists some of advantages and disadvantages of passive tags
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