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Pairing, the process whereby two Bluetooth devices establish a link and agree to communicate, is critical to the overall security architecture of Bluetooth and is tightly integrated with other Bluetooth security features During the pairing process, the communicating devices agree on and generate keys that are used to identify and reference relationships with other devices In addition to being used for these identification purposes, these keys are also used to generate additional keys used for both device authentication and communication encryption
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In versions prior to Bluetooth v21 + EDR (released in July 2007), pairing between devices is accomplished through the entry of a PIN or passkey with a maximum length of 128 bits There are two types of such passkeys: variable passkeys, which can be chosen at the time of pairing via some input mechanism, and fixed passkeys, which are predetermined (Bluetooth Security, p 29) The type of passkey used is typically determined by a device s input and display capabilities (for example, a Bluetooth-enabled phone with keyboard input and visual display may use a variable passkey, whereas a Bluetooth-enabled mouse may use a fixed passkey because it has neither input nor display capabilities to enter or verify a passkey)
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In Bluetooth v21 + EDR, a new method of pairing called Secure Simple Pairing was introduced The older method of pairing is supported when connecting to legacy devices, but the use of Secure Simple Pairing is mandated for communications between Bluetooth v21 + EDR devices
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From a user s perspective, Secure Simple Pairing is meant to provide additional flexibility and ease of use when pairing compatible devices that have far-ranging display and input capabilities However, from a security perspective, Secure Simple Pairing also improves security through the introduction of Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman (ECDH) for key exchange and link key generation Rather than relying on simple PIN/passkey entry and verification, Secure Simple Pairing offers four different means for pairing compatible devices (known as association models):
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For more information on Secure Simple Pairing, see the Bluetooth Simple Pairing Whitepaper at the Bluetooth website
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Numeric Comparison This association model is designed for situations where both communicating devices can display a six-digit number and have inputs that allow the user to enter yes or no A six-digit number from 000000 to 999999 is shown on both displays, and the user is prompted to respond whether the numbers are the same on both devices If yes is entered on both devices, then the devices are paired successfully Note that a primary difference between Numeric Comparison and the PIN model used in legacy pairing is the displayed number In Numeric Comparison, this value is not used as an input to further key generation, so an attacker who can observe the displayed number cannot use it to calculate other keys With the legacy PIN model, the PIN entered does factor into the generation of encryption keys, which makes PIN disclosure a real risk to the security of the communications Just Works This association model is intended for scenarios involving at least one device without the ability to display a six-digit number or to enter numbers This mode uses the same key agreement protocol as Numeric Comparison (with protections against passive eavesdropping), but the actual method whereby the user accepts the Bluetooth connection is determined by the product manufacturer This association model does not provide protection against man-in-the-middle attacks Out of Band This association model is intended for scenarios involving an out-of-band (OOB) mechanism (that is, non-Bluetooth) that is used to both discover the Bluetooth devices and exchange information during the pairing process The actual OOB mechanism will vary, but a commonly specified use case involving a Near Field Communication (NFC) OOB mechanism is device tapping This use case involves physically touching two devices together
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