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Device Architecture
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In order to provide flexibility in hardware support, SymbianOS implements a layered design where the majority of software components are provided by SymbianOS Device original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) provide the concrete implementations of necessary interfaces in order to interact with their product Figure 7-1 shows a simplified representation of a SymbianOS device
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Figure 7-1
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SymbianOS layered architecture
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The hardware layer represents the physical hardware of the device and is wholly the responsibility of the manufacturer developing the device SymbianOS devices can currently be based on the ARMv5, ARMv6, or ARMv7 architecture, although the layered design allows for a relatively straightforward porting process to other architectures Whatever hardware SymbianOS is operating on, it is only able to take advantage of the facilities exposed through the Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL)
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Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL)
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The HAL sits between the hardware and the kernel to significantly reduce the development effort required to support new platforms Hardware-specific interaction is factored into a Board Support Package (BSP) consisting of concrete implementations of several abstract interfaces consumed by the kernel In this fashion, SymbianOS can run on a wide variety of hardware platforms SymbianOS also provides a set of reference/test BSPs that OEMs can adapt to assist in the rapid development of device-specific code
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Kernel Services
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The kernel services layer is responsible for managing system resource allocation In addition to EKA2, the actual microkernel, several other critical services run within this layer For example, although the file server and assorted file systems do not execute within the kernel memory context, they are included here because devices would fail to function properly in their absence
OS Services
The OS services layer includes a set of frameworks and libraries that are not critical for the functioning of the device, but without which the device could not do anything useful without dramatic effort This includes libraries and services providing access to telephony, networking, windowing, multimedia, and so on These components execute as processes within the user memory context and are accessed through approved kernel-mediated interprocess communication (IPC) mechanisms
User Applications and Frameworks
The top layer consists of various user applications and frameworks, including both those preinstalled by an OEM and aftermarket applications installed by the end user Applications at this layer access device-specific functionality exclusively through OS-provided services As such, applications written against a specific SDK can be
7: SymbianOS Security
compiled for and run on a wide variety of supported phones The end user generally associates these components with the device because they perform useful and visible tasks
Device Storage
Storage on SymbianOS-based phones can be broken down into three logical components: ROM, fixed internal storage, and removable storage All SymbianOS phones include ROM and some form of fixed storage; most also include additional removable storage Access to all storage is performed through a common interface provided by file system drivers, concealing any physical differences among the devices
Built-in system code and applications are placed in a read-only segment, visible to the system as the Z: drive Although this can be an actual masked ROM or other specialized ROM device, it is commonly implemented using some form of flash memory This allows the manufacturer to readily upgrade system components throughout the life cycle of a device, including by an end user Some devices use NOR-based flash memory that is byte addressable and supports eXecute-in-Place (XiP), where code is run without copying into RAM Others use NAND flash that is only block addressable, requiring that code be copied into RAM before execution An OEM may choose to use NAND flash because this allows them to use the same physical chip to provide both the ROM and fixed storage functionality
Fixed Storage
Fixed storage is visible to the operating system as the C: drive and is available for persistently storing user settings, data, and applications This is generally implemented using NAND flash memory, although this is not the only possibility The size of this storage can vary widely among manufacturers Some devices will have additional internal storage made available to the system using another unique drive letter
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