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Networking: A Beginner s Guide, Second Edition
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Before we jump into the nitty gritty of the command-line interface under Linux, you must remember that this section is a far cry from an exhaustive discussion of Linux command-line tools Instead of trying to cover a lot of tools without any depth, this section covers in detail a smaller handful of tools that are most crucial for day-to-day work
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NOTE: All of the commands discussed in this section are to be performed in a terminal window If you are using the GNOME environment, you can open a terminal window by clicking on the picture of a monitor that appears on the control bar at the bottom of the screen If you are using KDE, you can use the menu in the lower-left corner of your screen; open the Utilities menu and choose Terminal Window This command displays a prompt that looks something like [root@hostname /root]#, where hostname is the name of your machine
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Environment Variables
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The concept of environment variables is almost the same under Windows NT as it is under UNIX The only difference is in how you set, view, and remove the variables
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To list all of your environment variables, use the printenv command, as in the following example:
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[root@ford /root]# printenv
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To show a specific environment variable, specify the variable as a parameter to printenv For example, to see the environment variable OSTYPE, you would type the following:
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[root@ford /root]# printenv OSTYPE
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Setting Environment Variables
To set an environment variable, use the following format:
[root@ford /root]# variable=value
where variable is the variable name, and value is the value that you want to assign the variable For example, to set the environment variable FOO with the value BAR, you would type the following:
[root@ford /root]# FOO=BAR
After setting the value, use the export command to finalize it The format of the export command is as follows:
[root@ford /root]# export variable
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Introduction to Linux Systems Administration
where variable is the name of the variable In the example of setting FOO, you would type the following:
[root@ford /root]# export FOO
TIP: You can combine the steps of setting the environment variable with the export command, as follows: [root@ford /root]# export FOO=BAR
If the value of the environment variable you want to set has spaces in it, you need to surround the variable with quotation marks In the preceding example, if you wanted to set FOO to Welcome to the BAR of FOO, you would type the following:
[root@ford /root]# export FOO="Welcome to the BAR of FOO"
Clearing Environment Variables
To remove an environment variable, use the unset command:
[root@ford /root]# unset variable
where variable is the name of the variable you want to remove For example, to remove the environment variable FOO, you would type the following:
[root@ford /root]# unset FOO
Nuances on the Command-Line Itself
One of the difficulties in moving to the command-line interface, especially if you are used to using command-line tools such as Windows commandcom, is dealing with a shell that has a great number of shortcuts that may surprise you if you re not careful This section reviews the most common of these nuances and explains why they behave the way they do
Filename Expansion
Under UNIX-based shells such as bash, you expand wildcards seen on the command line before passing them as a parameter to the application This is in contrast to the default mode of operation for DOS-based tools, which often have to perform their own wildcard expansion This also means that you have to be careful where you use the wildcard characters The wildcard characters themselves are identical to those in commandcom The asterisk (*) matches against all filenames, and the question mark ( ) matches against single characters If you need to use these characters as part of another parameter, you can escape them by placing a backslash (\) in front of them This character will cause the shell to interpret a wildcard as just another character
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