vb.net barcode font Figure 11-2 shows this process in action. in Java

Encoding Data Matrix ECC200 in Java Figure 11-2 shows this process in action.

Figure 11-2 shows this process in action.
Draw ECC200 In Java
Using Barcode printer for Android Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
EAN13 Drawer In Java
Using Barcode generator for Android Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
long factorial( long num ) { if ( num > 1 ) num *= factorial( num - 1 ); return( num ); }
DataMatrix Drawer In Java
Using Barcode generation for Android Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Creating ANSI/AIM Code 39 In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Android Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
long factorial( long num ) { if ( num > 1 ) num *= factorial( num - 1 ); return( num ); }
UPC Symbol Printer In Java
Using Barcode maker for Android Control to generate, create UPC Symbol image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generating Barcode In Java
Using Barcode generation for Android Control to generate, create Barcode image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
3*2*1
Draw Code 128 In Java
Using Barcode generator for Android Control to generate, create Code128 image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
USPS Intelligent Mail Encoder In Java
Using Barcode printer for Android Control to generate, create Intelligent Mail image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
long factorial( long num ) { Fails, since num == 1 if ( num > 1 ) num *= factorial( num - 1 ); return( num ); }
Data Matrix Drawer In None
Using Barcode creation for Excel Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode ECC200 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create ECC200 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 11-2. The recursion process caused by the call factorial(3)
Draw USS Code 39 In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create Code39 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Draw GTIN - 12 In None
Using Barcode printer for Word Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 2 image in Microsoft Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The process starts with a call to factorial():
EAN / UCC - 14 Printer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generate ECC200 In Java
Using Barcode generator for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
result = factorial( 3 );
Drawing UPC A In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET framework Control to generate, create GTIN - 12 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 39 Full ASCII Creator In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 11: Advanced Topics
Generate Barcode In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Barcode image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Making QR Code ISO/IEC18004 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create QR Code image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Take a look at the leftmost factorial() source code in Figure 11-2. factorial() is called with a parameter of 3. The if statement checks to see if the parameter is greater than 1. Since 3 is greater than 1, the following statement is executed:
GS1 DataBar Stacked Creator In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create GS1 DataBar image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Painting PDF-417 2d Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
num *= factorial( num - 1 );
This statement calls factorial() again, passing a value of n-1, or 2, as the parameter. This second call of factorial() is pictured in the center of Figure 11-2.
NOTE
It s important to understand that this second call to factorial() is treated just like any other function call that occurs in the middle of a function. The calling function s variables are preserved while the called function runs. In this case, the called function is just another copy of factorial().
This second call of factorial() takes a value of 2 as a parameter. The if statement compares this value to 1 and, since 2 is greater than 1, executes the statement:
num *= factorial( num - 1 );
This statement calls factorial() yet again, passing num-1, or 1, as a parameter. The third call of factorial() is portrayed on the rightmost side of Figure 11-2. The third call of factorial() starts with an if statement. Since the input parameter was 1, the if statement fails. Thus, the recursion termination condition is reached. Now, this third call of factorial() returns a value of 1. At this point, the second call of factorial() resumes, completing the statement:
num *= factorial( num - 1 );
Since the call of factorial() returned a value of 1, this statement is equivalent to
num *= 1;
leaving num with the same value it came in with, namely 2. This second call of factorial() returns a value of 2. At this point, the first call of factorial() resumes, completing the statement:
num *= factorial( num - 1 );
Since the second call of factorial() returned a value of 2, this statement is equivalent to
num *= 2;
CHAPTER 11: Advanced Topics
Since the first call of factorial() started with the parameter num taking a value of 3, this statement sets num to a value of 6. Finally, the original call of factorial() returns a value of 6. This is as it should be, since 3 factorial = 3 * 2 * 1 = 6.
NOTE
The recursive version of the factorial program is in the Learn C Projects folder, under the subfolder named 11.02 - recurse. Open the project and follow the program through, line by line.
Do not use recursion lightly. It is expensive in terms of system resources, relative to its iterative cousin. That said, read on for some problems that are perfect for recursion.
Binary Trees
As you learn more about data structures, you ll discover new applications for recursion. For example, one of the most-often-used data structures in computer programming is the binary tree (see Figure 11-3). As you ll see later, binary trees were just made for recursion. The binary tree is similar to the linked list. Both consist of structs connected by pointers embedded in each struct.
Root of Binary Tree
Figure 11-3. A binary tree. Why binary Each node in the tree contains two pointers.
CHAPTER 11: Advanced Topics
Linked lists are linear. Each struct in the list is linked by pointers to the struct behind it and in front of it in the list. Binary trees always start with a single struct, known as the root struct or root node. Where the linked list structs we ve been working with contain a single pointer, named next, binary tree structs or nodes each have two pointers, usually known as left and right. Check out the binary tree in Figure 11-3. Notice that the root node has a left child and a right child. The left child has its own left child but its right pointer is set to NULL. The left child s left child has two NULL pointers. A node with two NULL pointers is known as a leaf node or terminal node. Binary trees are extremely useful. They work especially well when the data you are trying to sort has a comparative relationship. This means that if you compare one piece of data to another, you ll be able to judge the first piece as greater than, equal to, or less than the second piece. For example, numbers are comparative. Words in a dictionary can be comparative, if you consider their alphabetical order. The word iguana is greater than aardvark, but less than xenophobe. Here s how you might store a sequence of words, one at a time, in a binary tree. We ll start with this list of words:
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.