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will leave myInt with a value of 16. This statement
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myInt = 5 + ( 3 * 2 );
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will leave myInt with a value of 11. You can use more than one set of parentheses in a statement, as long as they occur in pairs one left parenthesis associated with each right parenthesis. The statement
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myInt = ( ( 5 + 3 ) * 2 );
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will leave myInt with a value of 16.
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Operator Precedence
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In the previous section, I referred to C s built-in rules for resolving operator precedence. If you have a question about which operator has a higher precedence, look it up in the chart in Table 5-1. Here s how the table works.
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Table 5-1. The Relative Precedence of C s Built-In Operators
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Operators by Precedence ->, ., ++ *
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Order Left to right
prefix
, --
postfix unary
address of
unary
, !, ~, ++
, --
prefix
, sizeof
Right to left Right to left Left to right Left to right
Typecast *multiply, /, % +
binary
binary
left-shift
, >>
right-shift
Left to right Left to right Left to right Left to right Left to right Left to right Left to right Left to right Right to left Right to left Left to right
>, >=, <, <= ==, != & | && || : =, +=, -=, *=, /=, %=, >>=, <<=, &=, |=, ^= ,
bitwise-and
CHAPTER 5: C Basics: Variables and Operators
The higher an operator is in the chart, the higher its precedence. For example, suppose you are trying to predict the result of this line of code:
myInt = 5 * 3 + 7;
First, look up the operator * in Table 5-1. Hmm, this one seems to be in the chart twice, once with label pointer and once with the label multiply. You can tell just by looking at this line of code that we want the multiply version. The compiler is pretty smart. Just like you, it can tell that this is the multiply version of *. OK, now look up +. Yup, it s in there twice also, once as unary and once as binary. A unary
+ or - is the sign that appears before a number, like +147 or 32768. In our line of code,
the + operator has two operands, so clearly binary + is the one we want. Now that you ve figured out which operator is which, you can see that the multiply * is higher up on the chart than the binary +, and thus has a higher precedence. This means that the * will get evaluated before the +, as if the expression were written as
myInt = (5 * 3) + 7;
So far so good. Now, what about the following line of code
myInt = 27 * 6 % 5;
Both of these operators are on the fourth line in the chart. Which one gets evaluated first If both operators under consideration are on the same line in the chart, the order of evaluation is determined by the entry in the chart s rightmost column. In this case, the operators are evaluated from left to right. In the current example, % will get evaluated before *, as if the line of code were written
myInt = 27 * (6 % 5);
What about this line of code
myInt = 27 % 6 * 5;
In this case, the * will get evaluated before the %, as if the line of code were written
myInt = 27 % (6 * 5);
Of course, you can avoid this exercise altogether with a judicious sprinkling of parentheses. As you look through the chart, you ll definitely notice some operators that you haven t learned about yet. As you read through this book and encounter new operators, check back with Table 5-1 to see where they fit in.
CHAPTER 5: C Basics: Variables and Operators
Sample Programs
So far in this chapter, we ve discussed variables (mostly of type int) and operators (mostly mathematical). The program examples on the following pages combine variables and operators into useful C statements. We ll also learn a bit more about our friend from the Standard Library, the printf() function.
Opening operator.xcodeproj
Our next program, operator, provides a testing ground for some of the operators covered in the previous sections. main.c declares a variable (myInt) and uses a series of statements to change the value of the variable. By including a printf() after each of these statements, main.c makes it easy to follow the variable, step by step, as its value changes. In Xcode, close any project windows that may be open. In the Finder, locate the Learn C Projects folder and the 05.01 - operator subfolder, and double-click the file operator.xcodeproj. The operator project window should appear (see Figure 5-6).
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