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The lesson here is to use floats if you want to work with floating point numbers. Use doubles or long doubles for extra accuracy, but be aware of the extra cost in memory usage. Use ints for maximum speed if you want to work exclusively with whole numbers or if you want to truncate a result.
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The Integer Types
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So far, you ve learned about four different types three floating point types (float, double, and long double) and one integer type (int). In this section, I ll introduce the remaining integer types: char, short, and long. As was the case with the three floating point types, the size of each of the four integer types is implementation dependent. Our next program, intSizer, proves that point. You ll find intSizer.xcodeproj in the Learn C Projects folder, in the 08.02 - intSizer subfolder. intSizer consists of four printf()s, one for each of the integer types:
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printf( printf( printf( printf( "sizeof( "sizeof( "sizeof( "sizeof( char ) = %d\n", (int)sizeof( char ) ); short ) = %d\n", (int)sizeof( short ) ); int ) = %d\n", (int)sizeof( int ) ); long ) = %d\n", (int)sizeof( long ) );
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CHAPTER 8: Variable Data Types
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SHORT AND LONG INTS
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Though these forms are rarely used, a short is also known as a short int and a long is also known as a long int. As an example, these declarations are perfectly legal:
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short int long int myShort; myLong;
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Though the preceding declarations are just fine, you are more likely to encounter declarations like these:
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short long myShort; myLong;
As always, choose your favorite style and be consistent.
Like their floatSizer counterparts, these printf()s use sizeof to determine the size of a char, a short, an int, and a long. When I ran intSizer on my Mac, here s what I saw:
sizeof( sizeof( sizeof( sizeof( char ) = 1 short ) = 2 int ) = 4 long ) = 4
Again, the point to remember is that there are no guarantees. Don t assume the size of a type. Write a program to check for yourself.
Type Value Ranges
All the integer types can be either signed or unsigned. This obviously affects the range of values handled by that type. For example, a signed 1-byte char can store a value from 128 to 127, while an unsigned 1-byte char can store a value from 0 to 255. If this clouds your mind with pain, now might be a good time to go back and review 5. A signed 2-byte short can store values ranging from 32,768 to 32,767, while an unsigned 2-byte short can store values ranging from 0 to 65,535. A signed 4-byte long or int can store values ranging from 2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647, while an unsigned 4-byte long or int can store values ranging from 0 to 4,294,967,295. A 4-byte float can range in value from 3.4e + 38 to 3.4e + 38. An 8-byte double or long double can range in value from 1.7e + 308 to 1.7e + 308.
CHAPTER 8: Variable Data Types
Memory Efficiency vs. Safety
Each time you declare one of your program s variables, you ll have a decision to make. What s the best type for this variable In general, it s a good policy not to waste memory. Why use a long when a short will do just fine Why use a double when a float will do the trick There is a danger in being too concerned with memory efficiency. For example, suppose a customer asked you to write a program designed to print the numbers 1 through 100, one number per line. Sounds pretty straightforward just create a for loop and embed a printf() in the loop. In the interests of memory efficiency, you might use a char to act as the loop s counter. After all, if you declare your counter as an unsigned char, it can hold values ranging from 0 to 255. That should be plenty, right
unsigned char counter;
for ( counter=1; counter<=100; counter++ ) printf( "%d\n", counter );
This program works just fine. But suppose your customer comes back with a request, asking you to extend the program to count from 1 to 1,000 instead of just to 100. You happily change the 100 to 1,000, like so, and take it for a spin:
unsigned char counter;
for ( counter=1; counter<=1000; counter++ ) printf( "%d\n", counter );
What do you think will happen when you run it To find out, open the Learn C Projects folder, the 08.03 - typeOverflow subfolder, and the project typeOverflow.xcodeproj. Instead of just running the project this time, let s take things a bit slower. Start by compiling your code. Select Build from the Build menu. You should see a warning, just like the one shown in Figure 8-2. The warning tells us that the for loop comparison will always be true (counter will never exceed 1,000) due to the limited range of the unsigned char named counter. Good compiler! Even though we got a warning, we can still run our project. As a rule, I always fix my code before I run it, but in this case, I want you to see what happens when we run this program as is. Select Run from the Run menu, and then bring up the console window. As you ll see if you scroll through the console window, the program generates the numbers 1 through 255, one number per line, and then goes to 0 and starts climbing again (see Figure 8-3). This repeats on and on, ad infinitum. Congratulations on your first infinite loop!
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