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1: Architectural Overview of Oracle Database 11g
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PART I Figure 1-3 introduces a classic SQL query executed using the SQL Developer tool supplied by Oracle There are many tools that provide a SQL interface to the database, the most common of which is SQL*Plus Although the details of SQL queries are discussed in Part 2, they are generally intuitive, and for your immediate needs it is sufficient to interpret the query in Figure 1-3 as follows The keywords in the statement are SELECT, FROM, WHERE, and LIKE The asterisk in the first line instructs Oracle to retrieve all columns from the table called DICTIONARY Therefore both columns, called TABLE_NAME and COMMENTS respectively, are retrieved The second line contains a conditional WHERE clause that restricts the rows retrieved to only those which have a data value beginning with the characters V$SYS in the TABLE_NAME column
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The database installation will consume physical disk storage, and you are encouraged to start considering the hardware you have earmarked for your installation The two primary disk space consumers are Oracle program files and Oracle database datafiles The program files are often referred to as the Oracle binaries, since they collectively represent the compiled C programs essential for creating and maintaining databases Once the Oracle 11g binaries are installed, they consume about 3GB of disk space, but this usage remains relatively stable The datafiles, however, host the actual rows of data and shrink and grow as the database is used The default seed database that is relatively empty consumes about 2GB of disk space Another important hardware consideration is memory (RAM) You will require a minimum of 512MB of RAM, but at least 1GB is required for a usable system Most Unix platforms require preinstallation tasks, which involve ensuring that operating system users, groups, patches, kernel parameters, and swap space are adequately specified Consult with an operating system specialist if you are unfamiliar with these tasks The superuser (or root) privilege is required to modify these operating system parameters Commands for checking these resources are described in 2
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In this book, you will deal largely with the most common database environment: one instance on one computer, opening a database stored on local disks The more complex distributed architectures, involving multiple instances and multiple databases, are beyond the scope of the OCP examination (though not the OCM qualification), but you may realistically expect to see several high-level summary questions on distributed architectures
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The instance consists of memory structures and processes Its existence is transient, in your RAM and on your CPU(s) When you shut down the running instance, all trace of its existence goes away at the same time The database consists of physical files, on
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OCA/OCP Oracle Database 11g All-in-One Exam Guide
disk Whether running or stopped, these remain Thus the lifetime of the instance is only as long as it exists in memory: it can be started and stopped By contrast, the database, once created, persists indefinitely until you deliberately delete the files that are associated with the database The processes that make up the instance are known as background processes because they are present and running at all times while the instance is active These processes are for the most part completely self-administering, though in some cases it is possible for the DBA to influence the number of them and their operation The memory structures, which are implemented in shared memory segments provided by the operating system, are known as the system global area, or SGA This is allocated at instance startup and released on shutdown Within certain limits, the SGA in the 11g instance and the components within it can be resized while the instance is running, either automatically or in response to the DBA s instructions User sessions consist of a user process running locally to the user machine connecting to a server process running locally to the instance on the server machine The technique for launching the server processes, which are started on demand for each session, is covered in 4 The connection between user process and server process is usually across a local area network and uses Oracle s proprietary Oracle Net protocol layered on top of an industry-standard protocol (usually TCP) The user process to server process split implements the client-server architecture: user processes generate SQL; server processes execute SQL The server processes are sometimes referred to as foreground processes, in contrast with the background processes that make up the instance Associated with each server process is an area of nonsharable memory, called the program global area, or PGA This is private to the session, unlike the system global area, which is available to all the foreground and background processes Note that background processes also have a PGA The size of any one session s PGA will vary according to the memory needs of the session at any one time; the DBA can define an upper limit for the total of all the PGAs, and Oracle manages the allocation of this to sessions dynamically TIP You will sometimes hear the term shadow process Be cautious of using this Some people use it to refer to foreground processes; others use it for background processes Memory management in 11g can be completely automated: the DBA need do nothing more than specify an overall memory allocation for both the SGA and the PGA and let Oracle manage this memory as it thinks best Alternatively, the DBA can determine memory allocations There is an in-between technique, where the DBA defines certain limits on what the automatic management can do EXAM TIP SGA memory is shared across all background and foreground processes; PGA memory can be accessed only by the foreground process of the session to which it has been allocated Both SGA and PGA memory can be automatically managed
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