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Perl: The Complete Reference
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Operators
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Operators perform some sort of operation on a value or variable For example, the + operator adds two numbers together:
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$sum = 4 + 5;
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Other operators allow you to perform other basic math calculations, introduce lists of values (for use with functions and variables), and assign values to variables and subroutines There are also operators that enable us to use regular expressions that can match information contained within a string against an expression, or perform a substitution so that we can replace and translate information without having to explicitly define its contents We ll be looking at Perl operators, and the core mechanics of how Perl takes a raw script and interprets the contents, in 3
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Statements
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Statements enable us to control the execution of our script for example, we might use the if statement to test the value of a variable or operation so that the script can make an informed decision about what to do next Other statements include the loops, which allow us to repeat a process on the same piece of data or on a sequence of data Statements also include declarations, such as those that allow us to define variables and subroutines We ll be covering statements and control structures in 5
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Subroutines (Functions)
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When you want to perform an operation on a variable a number of times, or the same operation on a number of variables, it makes sense to place that sequence of operations into a subroutine or function Now when you want to perform that operation, you send the variable to the subroutine, and then use the value returned from that subroutine Perl includes a number of subroutines that perform different operations including the print subroutine, which sends information to the screen (or to a file) Other subroutines built into Perl include those for opening and communicating with files, talking over a network, or accessing information about the system Other built-ins provide simple ways for performing different operations on variables and values You can also produce your own subroutines something we ll be looking at in 6
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2:
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Perl Overview
Modules
Once you have a collection of subroutines that you find useful, then you ll probably want to use them in other scripts and applications that you build with Perl You could copy them to the new scripts, but a much better solution is to make your own modules These are the libraries that extend the functionality of Perl Perl comes with its own, quite extensive, set of modules that allow you to communicate over a network (see 12), develop user interfaces (see 17), access external databases (see 13), and provide an interface for communicating with a web server and a client browser when developing web solutions (see 18) If you can t find what you want within the standard Perl distribution, then there is a central repository of modules built by other programmers called CPAN This contains literally thousands of modules to handle everything from accessing data sources through to handling XML (Extensible Markup Language) We ll be looking at how to build our own modules in 6
FUNDAMENTALS
Where Next
The answer to that question is really up to you Perl will let you do almost anything If you need to understand the basics of how Perl works and how scripts are interpreted, their elements identified, and rules followed, then continue reading s 3 through to 6 If you want a little more detail on the sort of things Perl can do and how you might approach them, read s 7 through 9 If you already know the basics and want to use Perl to solve a particular problem, use the s in Part 2, which cover everything from Perl s object-orientation system to extending Perl with external libraries
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