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Noise temperature is often specified for receivers and amplifiers in combination with, or in lieu of, the noise figure The noise temperature concept is also applied to antennas where it is related to the amount of thermal noise generated by the resistive component of the antenna feedpoint impedance The antenna-receiver system will be afflicted by three different noise sources external to the receiver The first is the thermal noise temperature of the feedpoint impedance (TR) The sky exhibits a noise temperature that depends on where the antenna main lobe is pointed Similarly, the ground has a noise temperature that consists of components reflected from the sky as well as components of its own caused by whatever thermal agitation exists In a typical system (Fig 20-1) the
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20-1 Contributors to antenna noise temperature
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420 Antenna noise temperature main lobe will be pointed toward the sky noise source, while the sidelobes will pick up noise from the ground The total noise temperature of the antenna is TANT where TANT is the equivalent noise temperature of the antenna TSKY is the noise temperature of the sky TGND is the noise temperature of the ground TR is the feedpoint resistance noise temperature M is the fraction of the total energy that enters the main lobe is the fraction of sidelobes that are viewing the ground (only one of several sidelobes is shown in Fig 20-1) (M TSKY) (1 M)TGND TR [207]
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FOR CENTURIES ASTRONOMERS HAVE SCANNED THE HEAVENS WITH OPTICAL TELESCOPES But today, astronomers have many more tools in their bag, and one of them is radio astronomy The field of radio astronomy emerged in the 1930s and 1940s through the work of Grote Reber and Carl Jansky Even during World War II, progress was made as many tens of thousands of operators were listening to frequencies from dc to near daylight (well, actually, the low-end microwave bands) British radar operators noted during the Battle of Britain that the distance at which they could detect German aircraft dropped when the Milky Way was above the horizon Although there is a lot of amateur radio astronomy being done, most of it requires microwave equipment with low-noise front ends However, there are several things that almost anyone can do The topic of antennas for radio astronomy can include nearly all forms of directional gain antenna It is common to see Yagis, ring Yagis, cubical quads, and other antennas for lower-frequency use (18 to 1200 MHz) Microwave gain antennas can be used for higher frequencies Indeed, many amateur radio astronomers appropriate TV receive-only (TVRO) satellite dish antennas for astronomy work In this chapter we will cover some antennas that are not found in other chapters, at least not in this present context
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Jupiter is a strong radio source (next to the sun, it s the strongest in the sky) It produces noiselike signals over the spectrum 5 to 40 MHz, with peaks between 18 and 24 MHz One source claims that the radio signals come from massive storms on the largest planet s surface, apparently triggered by the transit of the jovian moons through the planet s magnetic field The signals are plainly audible on the HF band any time Jupiter is above the horizon, day or night However, in order to eliminate the possibility of both local and terrestrial skip signals from interfering, Jupiter DXers prefer to listen during the hours after 2100 [or whenever the maximum usable frequency (MUF) drops significantly below 18 MHz] and local sunup Listen to the
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422 Antennas for radio astronomy amateur 17- or 15-m bands If you hear zilch activity, then it s a good bet that the MUF has dropped enough to make listening worthwhile Even during the day, however, it is possible to hear jovian signals, but differentiating them from other signals or solar noise is difficult So what do you need to DX Jupiter It would help to have a decent radio receiver that works well over the range 18 to 24 MHz Some cheaper radio receivers are not desirable, but most modern communications receivers are fine The radio signals are rising and falling swooshing noises The chances of receiving a signal from Jupiter are about 1 in 6, according to several radio astronomers The antenna can be a simple dipole cut for the middle of the 18- to 24-MHz band, which happens to be a 15-m amateur radio band antenna The antenna should be installed in the normal manner for any dipole, except that the wire must run east-west in order to pick up the southerly rising planet Figure 21-1 shows a broadband dipole that covers the entire frequency region of interest (18 to 24 MHz) by paralleling three different dipoles: one cut for 18 MHz, one cut for 21 MHz, and one cut for 24 MHz The dimensions are
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