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One of the old standbys for all bands is the random-length Marconi antenna Such antennas consist of a length of wire, typically (but not always) less than /4, and fed at one end with coaxial cable and an L-section coupler (Fig 26-6) The antenna radiator element can be angled in any direction as needed, but it works best if the radiator is either as horizontal, or vertical, as possible (for pure polarization) The usual situation, however, is to run the wire at an inclined angle, or with about equal portions horizontal and vertical (see the inverted L) which yields complex polarization
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508 Antennas for low-frequency operation
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26-4 Method for impedance matching a tower antenna
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Random-length Marconi 509
Single-conductor feedline (delta feed)
Coax to XMTR
26-5 Delta matching a grounded vertical tower antenna Rope
Radiator
End insulator
L1 Coupler (interchange L1 and C1 when antenna 4 )
26-6 Random-length wire antenna
510 Antennas for low-frequency operation The L-section coupler shown in Fig 26-6 is set up for the case where the antenna radiator element is less than /4 (ie, a series inductor and a shunt capacitor) If the antenna is longer than /4 on some frequency, then reverse the positions of the capacitor and inductor
Inverted-L antennas
Another popular antenna for low frequencies is the /4 inverted-L (Fig 26-7) In this type of antenna, two sections are erected at a 90 angle with respect to each other; one vertical and the other horizontal One way to think of this antenna is bent /4 vertical, although some people liken it to a top-loaded vertical The feedline can be 52- or 75- coaxial cable It is generally the case that the sections of the inverted-L are equal in length ( /8 each), but that is not strictly necessary As the vertical section becomes longer (with overall length remaining at /4), the angle of radiation depresses One popular method of construction is to use a tower for the vertical section, and a run of wire for the horizontal section If you already have a 60-ft tower to accommodate the beam antenna used on higher frequencies, then it is relatively easy to build an inverted-L antenna for 160 m
8 Rope
End insulator
To XMTR
26-7 L-section quarter-wavelength antenna
Random-length Marconi 511
The linearly loaded tee antenna
A tee antenna consists of a horizontal radiator element fed at the center with a single conductor wire (not coax) that is a quarter-wavelength long, and goes away from the radiator at a right angle Such antennas were popular prior to World War II in the United States, although popularity fell off in the late 1930s as other types (and reasonably priced transmission lines) became available The tee is possibly one of the oldest forms of radio transmitting antennas Like other antennas at low frequencies, however, it is far too long for easy use in most locations We can, however, linearly load the tee by folding the ends of the radiator back on themselves to form the zigzag pattern of Fig 26-8 Popular in Europe for some time, this antenna can provide reasonable performance on the lower frequencies without using too much horizontal space The radiator element consists of three sections that are each about /6 long (L1 = 164/FMHz), and spaced 8 to 12 in apart; they are parallel to each other The quarter-wavelength transmission line is connected to the center point of the middle section of the radiator element Figure 26-9 shows how the linearly loaded tee antenna could be built using wire for the radiator elements Spreaders made of 24-in-long 1 2-in lumber (treated against the weather), plastic, or some other synthetic material can be used Each spreader has three holes drilled in it spaced about 10 in apart Spreaders A and E are end spreaders, and are identical except for being upside down with respect to each other In each case, one of the radiator element conductor sections is terminated, while the other passes through to the back of the spreader to join the center radiator element The other spreaders are used either for center support, as in C (note the transmission line attachment), or for interim support between the center insulator and the end insulators
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