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Roy Lewallen, W7EL, produces the EZNEC for Windows software The software extends Roy s earlier work on DOS versions of EZNEC but is still based on the NEC-2 engine (a NEC-4 professional version is available for those with the required license from the University of California) Figure 17-8 shows the basic window that opens when you open an antenna project (in this case, a 10-MHz dipole) Given in the active window are file name, frequency, wavelength (in meters), number of wires and segments, number of sources, number of loads, transmission lines, ground type, wire loss, the units being calculated
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17-7 VSWR curve of the modeled antenna
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17-8 Basic window of EZNEC for Windows
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336 Antenna modeling software (meters, feet, etc), plot type (azimuth, elevation), elevation angle, step size, a reference level, and an alternate SWR Zo There are command buttons to the left of the main window These include Open, Save As, Currents, Sto Dat, Load Dat, FF Tab, NF Tab, SWR, View Antenna, and FF Plot The View Antenna button provides a view of the xyz coordinate system along with the wires (Fig 17-9) The FF Plot button plots the far field of the antenna, and the SWR button plots the SWR curve based on parameters you give it (starting frequency, stopping frequency, frequency step) The View Antenna window is shown in Fig 17-9 This antenna view provides the xyz coordinate system, along with the wires There are scroll bars to the left of the main window where the antenna appears that are used to vary the image to better see it A series of three Reset buttons resets the image to the initial setting If you wish to plot the radiation pattern (azimuth or elevation) of the antenna, then press FF Plot in the main window The result will be as shown in Fig 17-10 Some data appears in the lower window on the plot The data in this case are elevation angle, outer ring gain, slice gain maximum, front-to-side ratio, beamwidth, side-
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17-9 View Antenna window of EZNEC for Windows
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17-10 Result of pressing FF Plot button in main window of EZNEC for Windows
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lobe gain, front/sidelobe, cursor azimuth, and gain You can print out the plot of the radiation pattern with either the data present or the data hidden One of the really nice things about EZNEC for Windows is the availability of VSWR plots without going to the professional edition Figure 17-11 shows the plot for the dipole under consideration Note that the data given include the starting frequency, the SWR at the starting frequency, the impedance at the starting frequency, the reflection coefficient at the starting frequency, and the source impedance
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Burke, G J, and A J Poggio, Numerical Electromagnetics Code (NEC) Method of Moments, Naval Ocean Systems Center Technical Document 116, January 1981 King, R W P, Tables of Antenna Characteristics, IFI/Plenum Data Corporation, New York, 1971 Prasad, S, and R W P King, Experimental Study of L-, T- and Related Transmission Line Antennas, Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards D Radio Propagation, Vol 65D(5): 1961
338 Antenna modeling software
17-11 VSWR plot of a dipole with EZNEC for Windows
Rockway, J W, and J C Logan, MiniNEC Professional for Windows, EM Scientific, Inc, Carson City, NV, 1995 Rockway, J W, and J C Logan, MiniNEC Broadcast Professional for Windows, EM Scientific, Inc, Carson City, NV, 1996 Rockway, J W, and J C Logan, Advances in MiniNEC, IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, 37(4): 1995
CHAPTER
VHF/UHF transmitting and receiving antennas
THE VHF/UHF SPECTRUM IS COMMONLY ACCEPTED TO RANGE FROM 30 MHZ TO 900 MHZ, although the upper breakpoint is open to some differences of opinion The VHF spectrum is 30 MHz to 300 MHz, and the UHF spectrum is 300 MHz to 900 MHz Above 900 MHz is the microwave spectrum These bands are used principally for local line-of-sight communications, according to the standard wisdom However, with the advent of OSCAR satellites, the possibility of long-distance direct communications is a reality for VHF/UHF operators In addition, packet radio is becoming common; this means indirect long-distance possibilities through networking For the low end of the VHF spectrum (eg, 6-m amateur band), long-distance communications are a relatively common occurrence In many respects, the low-VHF region is much like the 10-m amateur band and 11-m Citizens Band: skip is not an infrequent occurrence Many years ago, I recall an event where such skip caused many a local police officer to skip a heart beat In those days, our police department operated on 3817 MHz, which is between the 6-m and 10-m amateur bands They received an emergency broadcast concerning a bank robbery at a certain Wilson Boulevard address After a race to the county line, they discovered that the reported address would be outside of the county, and in fact did not exist even in the neighboring county (a number was skipped) The problem was traced to a police department in a southwest city that also had a Wilson Boulevard, and for them the alarm was real The principal difference between the lower frequencies and the VHF/UHF spectrum is that the wavelengths are shorter in the VHF/UHF region Consider the fact that the wavelengths for these bands range from 10 m to 1 m for the VHF region, and from 1 m to 33 cm for the UHF region Most antenna designs are based on wavelength, so that fact has some implications for VHF/UHF antenna design For example, because bandwidth is a function of length/diameter ratio for many classes of antenna, broadbanding an antenna in the VHF/UHF region is relatively easy If, say, 25-mm (ie, 1-in) aluminum tubing is used to make a quarter-wavelength vertical, then the approximate L/D ratio is 790 in the 8-m band and 20 in the 2-m band This feature is fortunate, because the VHF/UHF bands tend to be wider than the HF bands
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