.net barcode reader sdk free THE INCONSISTENCY OF TERMS in Font

Draw PDF 417 in Font THE INCONSISTENCY OF TERMS

THE INCONSISTENCY OF TERMS
PDF 417 Drawer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Maker In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Before we go any further with defining terms, we have to caution you that there is a lot of inconsistency in how terms are used in the industry. Not everyone agrees on which term to use and when to use it, which really makes learning these terms difficult for a beginner. However, we offer the following examples as a guideline. When a developer is at the planning phase of designing a class, he might call the data of a class its attributes. After the class has been planned and the actual coding begins, he may still use the term attribute, but often you will hear him switch to the term properties for that same data. Finally, when programmers are discussing an object, and not the class the object is made from, you will usually hear the object s data called its properties, and seldom called its attributes. The following are some of the names you will hear data called:
Making Code 128 Code Set C In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Drawing Code 39 Extended In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 6 CREATING TESTWARE COMPONENTS
Painting PDF 417 In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create PDF417 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UPC-A Supplement 2 Printer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 2 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Attributes Properties Data members Fields Variables Constants Arrays, hashes, or collections Enums (or enumerations) Arguments Parameters Believe it or not, there are even more out there, but by now you should be getting the idea that there are lots of names for data and you should pay attention to when these terms are used. In addition, you should know that different geographical locations favor one term over another. When you are testing, keep an eye out for anything that holds some kind of data. As mentioned earlier, the basic design of a program will involve its use of properties and methods. Identifying the properties and methods will help you decide what the application does and how the different parts of an application work together. Most people will search the Internet for code examples to help them build their projects. This is especially true of people that do not code everyday for a living, like testers. The good news is that there are a lot of free code examples out there; the bad news is that it takes time and patience to know what code examples do and determine if you can make them work for your needs. Since the description of what the code does can be written by many people, learning the different names for things and how they are used will help out immensely.
EAN-13 Supplement 5 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make Code11 In None
Using Barcode generator for Font Control to generate, create USD8 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Classes and Objects
Drawing PDF417 In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Making PDF417 In VS .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Reporting Service Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
When you design your classes, you will have decide if you want other people to access the properties and methods directly from the class or whether they have to create an object of the class first and then access them. Most of the time, you will choose to create objects first. An object is created by taking a copy of all the class s code from memory and putting that copy into its own memory space. Any changes to this copy will not affect the original class, so you can change the properties without fear that it will affect other areas of your program without you telling it to. Also, you can make as many copies as you need from the class. Each of these copies will be an object instance of that class.
GS1 - 13 Generation In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPad Control to generate, create EAN 13 image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encoding Code 128 Code Set A In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create Code 128B image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Planning Your Bug-Reporter Application
Print Code 39 Extended In None
Using Barcode generator for Online Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
PDF-417 2d Barcode Decoder In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Now that you know what properties and methods your application needs, you can start to design it. To start with, let s make a list of what data this application needs and what it is going to do.
Scan PDF-417 2d Barcode In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Recognize UPC A In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 6 CREATING TESTWARE COMPONENTS
Print PDF-417 2d Barcode In Java
Using Barcode maker for BIRT Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code128 Scanner In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Examples of data that needs saving are Tester s name Application s name Build number Date reported Description Filename Examples of things that need doing are Getting data from the user about the bug Saving the data to a file Here are a couple more questions you should ask yourself when you are designing a program: First, What data will you collect from the user This will translate into what textboxes and other controls you add. And second, What data will the application provide for the user This will translate into what labels and text you use. Once you have examined these questions, then you would sketch out what the User Interface (UI) would look like. Since testware must be built quickly and is usually rather simple, don t spend too much time on this part of the process. Most testware applications are very small at least when you compare them to something like the next version of Microsoft s Office Suite. Months of planning go into something like Office before a single line of code is written. When planning testware, your goal should be to list the properties, methods, and basic design quickly. As you create your application, you will often find that you missed something at first. This is a natural part of creating testware, so don t stress over getting it perfect the first time. Your first goal should be to create a working model of the testware, and then make improvements later after you have a better picture of what you really need to accomplish your goals. Once you can prove how your goals can be accomplished, then you can go back and improve your code as needed. At that point, your new goals will be the following: Add properties and methods that you did not think of before. Add error handling. Yes, testware need error handling, too (if for no other reason than other testers can use your testware without having to learn the inner workings of your code). Add validation to the UI to keep your fellow testers from using your application incorrectly. Separate the different parts of your application into different self-contained sections so that you can reuse these sections on different testware projects. In Exercise 6-1, you will start the process of building a simple, component-based application. As you progress through this chapter, you will continue improving on this initial design.
UCC - 12 Generation In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create GTIN - 128 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generate EAN-13 Supplement 5 In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPhone Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.