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Appendix B 7
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Appendix A
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Practical Software Project Estimation
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Whether you are looking for a quick indicative estimate for a feasibility report; a detailed estimate for a quotation or capital expenditure request; or a way to standardize and formalize your quoting, this book provides what you need This publication has been developed for those professionals who face the day-to-day challenge of coming up with credible estimates for effort and duration of software projects Readers are not expected to be knowledgeable of, or proficient in the use of, functional size measurement For those who are interested, there are chapters that provide simple explanations and examples of how to measure software size using a functional size measure As well as the professionals who produce estimates, other system developers, project managers, students, and lecturers should find a wealth of useful information here
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project estimation: Background, Concepts, and approaches
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n this chapter we explain the typical and distinct types of requirements that make up a software development or enhancement project; the various effort estimation approaches that are covered in this book; what is involved in producing a detailed estimate; and the use of functional size1 measurement in effort estimation Throughout this book we concentrate on estimating the effort and duration involved in a software project Effort and duration estimation normally leads to the estimation of cost, so we have provided an introduction to cost estimation in 15
Types of Project Requirements
Before we delve into the different estimation approaches, it is important to understand the different types of requirements that make up a project and to be aware of what is, and is not, included in the estimation approaches in this book The project estimation approaches explained in this book rely on the functional size of the software as a key input variable and are
Functional size is the size of the software to be developed It is expressed in units such as function points The units may vary depending on the chosen functional size measurement method (FSMM) Functional size measurement can be compared to the measurement of a building being expressed in square meters or square feet
practical Software project estimation
User-Driven Requirements 1 Functional (User) Requirements
2 Nonfunctional (User) Requirements
Software Project Requirements
3 Technical (Build) Requirements
Developer/ Construction Requirements
Figure 1-1
Types of software development project requirements
applicable to projects where software is developed or enhanced This will be explained further after the discussion on types of requirements, since not every project that involves software or systems is suitable for functional size measurement Functional size measurement pertains specifically to projects where software is developed, modified, or enhanced To make sense of functional size measurement and where it fits with estimating, it is useful to discuss the three types of software project requirements Figure 1-1 shows the different types of software project requirements Elsewhere in this book we will discuss a number of ways to establish the functional size of a piece of software without needing detailed knowledge of functional sizing
Note The word user in the context of functional size measurement
means any person or thing that interacts with the software at any time (such as other pieces of software, hardware, end users, and administrators) that has a requirement for data or services supported by the software being developed2 This is an important concept because functional size measurement can be used to size software that has no human users For example, the software interacts with other software or hardware It may be useful to think of a user as analogous to an actor in the Use Case methodology (For other definitions, refer to the Glossary)
As depicted in Figure 1-1, project requirements can be categorized into three distinct types (this breakdown also increases understanding
For a definition of user in the context of functional size, refer to ISO/IEC 141431:2007 as (ISO, 2007) standard
1:
project estimation
between the users and the project team) The three types of requirements are as follows: Functional requirements These represent WHAT functions will be included in the software Functional requirements are the business processes performed by or supported by the software (for example, record and store ambient temperature) and include the functions that the software must perform The size of functional requirements is expressed in function points Nonfunctional requirements This is the second type of software requirement and represents HOW the software must perform Nonfunctional requirements describe how the software must operate and are not included in functional size Sometimes known as quality requirements, the nonfunctional requirements include suitability, accuracy, interoperability, compliance, security, reliability, efficiency, maintainability, portability, and quality in use, as described by the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standard ISO/IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) 9126 series, plus a range of performance requirements While these requirements should also be defined by the system s users/customers, they are often not articulated separately (or at all), but rather are sprinkled throughout requirements documents The nonfunctional requirements are the contracted specifications for the software and include requirements for security (for example, data encryption), performance (for example, response time and reliability), accuracy (for example, governmental approvals required), and other specifications of how the software must perform Technical (build) requirements These requirements address how the software will be developed or built and include tools, methods, type of project, resource skill levels, and so on These requirements are where architectural design, configuration management methods, development methodology, use of packages, and use of CASE (Computer Aided Software Engineering) tools, for example, come into play The technical requirements include hardware and software requirements, infrastructure requirements, database type, and so on All three types of project requirements are necessary to produce a realistic estimate of the total software project effort
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