vb.net barcode reader code Q = 119 VAR 60 in Software

Maker QR Code JIS X 0510 in Software Q = 119 VAR 60

Q = 119 VAR 60
QR-Code Recognizer In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
QR Code ISO/IEC18004 Drawer In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create QR-Code image in Software applications.
P = 684 W
Quick Response Code Reader In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Creating QR Code 2d Barcode In C#.NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in VS .NET applications.
Comments: The power factor correction is illustrated in Figure 720 You can see that it
Encoding Quick Response Code In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in ASP.NET applications.
Quick Response Code Printer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR-Code image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
is possible to eliminate the reactive part of the impedance, thus signi cantly increasing the percentage of real power transferred from the source to the load Power factor correction is a very common procedure in electrical power systems
QR Drawer In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in .NET applications.
ANSI/AIM Code 39 Generator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Software applications.
7
EAN128 Generation In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create UCC.EAN - 128 image in Software applications.
Generating Barcode In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
AC Power
Printing Barcode In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Code 128C Generator In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Software applications.
~ IS + 50 ~ VS + ~ ~ VL j 867 Parallel capacitor for power factor correction C QL = 119 VAR
Paint British Royal Mail 4-State Customer Barcode In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create British Royal Mail 4-State Customer Barcode image in Software applications.
Encoding Code 128B In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
S= 684 VA
Barcode Creation In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create bar code image in Font applications.
Generating Matrix Barcode In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
P= 684 W Re QC = 119 VAR
Drawing Linear 1D Barcode In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create Linear Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
GTIN - 12 Decoder In VB.NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
Figure 720 Power factor correction
Code 3 Of 9 Generator In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPad Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in iPad applications.
Recognize ANSI/AIM Code 39 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Focus on Computer-Aided Tools: A le containing the computer-generated solution to
Multisim
this problem may be found in the CD-ROM that accompanies this book
EXAMPLE 79 Can a Series Capacitor Be Used for Power Factor Correction
Problem
~ IS jXC R ~ + V ~ S jXL
The circuit of Figure 721 proposes the use of a series capacitor to perform power factor correction Show why this is not a feasible alternative to the parallel capacitor approach demonstrated in Example 78
Solution
Known Quantities: Source voltage; load impedance
Find: Load (source) current
j XL = j 867
Schematics, Diagrams, Circuits, and Given Data: VS = 117 (0) V; RL = 50 ; j XC = j 867
Assumptions: Use rms values for all phasor quantities in the problem
Analysis: To determine the feasibility of the approach, we compute the load current and
voltage, to observe any differences between the circuit of Figure 721 and that of Figure 720 First, we compute the load impedance: ZL = R + j XL j XC = 50 + j 867 j 867 = 50 Next, we compute the load (source) current: VL 117 (0) = 234 A = I L = IS = ZL 50
Comments: Note that a twofold increase in the series current results from the addition of the series capacitor This would result in a doubling of the power required by the generator, with respect to the solution found in Example 78 Further, in practice the parallel connection is much easier to accomplish, since a parallel element can be added externally, without the need for breaking the circuit
Part I
Circuits
The Wattmeter
The instrument used to measure power is called a wattmeter The external part of a wattmeter consists of four connections and a metering mechanism that displays the amount of real power dissipated by a circuit The external and internal appearance of a wattmeter are depicted in Figure 722 Inside the wattmeter are two coils: a current-sensing coil, and a voltage-sensing coil In this example, we assume for simplicity that the impedance of the current-sensing coil, ZI , is zero and the impedance of the voltage-sensing coil, ZV , is in nite In practice, this will not necessarily be true; some correction mechanism will be required to account for the impedance of the sensing coils
FOCUS ON MEASUREMENTS
+ + Current + Voltage External connections + LV + ~ V
~ I LI
Wattmeter coils (inside)
A wattmeter should be connected as shown in Figure 723, to provide both current and voltage measurements We see that the current-sensing coil is placed in series with the load and the voltage-sensing coil is placed in parallel with the load In this manner, the wattmeter is seeing the current through and the voltage across the load Remember that the power dissipated by a circuit element is related to these two quantities The wattmeter, then, is constructed to provide a readout of the product of the rms values of the load current and the voltage, which is the real power absorbed by the load: P = Re (S) = Re (VI )
~ I ZS + + ~ VS ~ LV ~ V Load LI
7
AC Power
1 For the circuit shown in Figure 724, show the connections of the wattmeter, and nd the power dissipated by the load 2 Show the connections that will determine the power dissipated by R2 What should the meter read
R1 L
~ VS + ~
Source
Load vS(t) = 156 cos(377t) R1 = 10 R2 = 5 L = 20 mH
Solution:
1 To measure the power dissipated by the load, we must know the current through and the voltage across the entire load circuit This means that the wattmeter must be connected as shown in Figure 725 The wattmeter should read: P = Re (VS I ) = Re = Re 110 0 Re 110 0 156 0 2
156 0 2
R1 + R2 + j L
110 0 15 + j 754 110 0 1679 0466
= Re
1102 1679 0466
= Re (72067 0466) = 64388 W
+ VS ~
LI I
Part I
Circuits
2 To measure the power dissipated by R2 alone, we must measure the current through R2 and the voltage across R2 alone The connection is shown in Figure 726 The meter will read P = I 2 R2 = = 215 W
~ I LI + ~ VS + ~ LV ~ V R2
110 2 + 7542 )1/2 (15
1102 152 + 7542
How Hall-Effect Current Transducers Work1
In 1879, E H Hall noticed that if a conducting material is placed in a magnetic eld perpendicular to a current ow, a voltage perpendicular to both the initial current ow and the magnetic eld is developed This voltage is called the Hall voltage and is directly proportional to both the strength of the magnetic eld and the current It results from the de ection of the moving charge carriers from their normal path by the magnetic eld and its resulting transverse electric eld To illustrate the physics involved, consider a con ned stream of free particles each having a charge e and an initial velocity ux A magnetic eld in the Z direction will produce a de ection in the y direction Therefore, a charge imbalance is created; this results in an electric eld Ey This electric eld, the Hall eld, will build up until the force it exerts on a charged particle counterbalances the force resulting from the magnetic eld Now subsequent particles of the same charge and velocity are no longer de ected A steady state exists Figure 727 depicts this effect The Hall effect occurs in any conductor In most conductors the Hall voltage is very small and is dif cult to measure Dr Warren E Bulman, working with others, developed semiconductor compounds in the early 1950s that made the Hall effect practical for measuring magnetic elds The choice of materials for the active Hall element of most Hall probes is indium arsenide (InAs) This semiconductor compound is manufactured from highly re ned elemental arsenic and indium From an ingot of the semiconductor compound, thin slices are taken These slices are then diced
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.