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Hypothesis
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New hypothesis Figure 1.2
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A schematic of the scienti c method. An observation leads the researcher to propose a hypothesis, and then to make predictions from the hypothesis and to test these predictions by experiment. The results of the experiment either support or refute the hypothesis. If the experiment refutes the hypothesis, a new hypothesis must be developed. If the experiment supports the hypothesis, the researcher or others design further experiments to try to disprove it.
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HOW DO WE KNOW
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Genetics is an empirical science, which means that our information comes from observations of the natural world. The scienti c method is a tool for understanding these observations ( g. 1.2). At its heart is the experiment, which tests a guess, called a hypothesis, about how something works. In a good experiment, only two types of outcomes are possible: outcomes that support the hypothesis and outcomes that refute it. Scientists say these outcomes provide strong inference. For example, you might have the idea that organisms can inherit acquired characteristics, an idea put forth by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (1744 1829), a French biologist. Lamarck used the example of short-necked giraffes evolving into the long-necked giraffes we know of today. He suggested that giraffes that reached higher into trees to get at edible leaves developed longer necks. They passed on these longer necks to their offspring (in small increments in each generation), leading to today s long-necked giraffes. An alternative view, evolution by natural selection, was put forward in 1859 by Charles Darwin. According to the Darwinian view, giraffes normally varied in neck length, and these variations were inherited. Giraffes with slightly longer necks would be at an advantage in reaching edible leaves in trees. Therefore, over time, the longer-necked giraffes would survive and reproduce better than the shorter-necked ones. Thus, longer necks would come to predominate. Any genetic mutations (changes) that introduced greater neck length would be favored. To test Lamarck s hypothesis, you might begin by designing an experiment. You could do the experiment on giraffes to test Lamarck s hypothesis directly; however, giraffes are dif cult to acquire, maintain, and breed. Remember, though, that you are testing a general hypothesis about the inheritance of acquired characteristics rather than a speci c hypothesis about giraffes. Thus, if you are clever enough, you can test the hypothesis with almost any organism. You would certainly choose one that is easy to maintain and manipulate experimentally. Later, you can verify the generality of any particular conclusions with tests on other organisms. You might decide to use lab mice, which are relatively inexpensive to obtain and keep and have a relatively short generation time of about six weeks, compared with the giraffe s gestation period of over a year. Instead of looking at neck length, you might simply cut off the tip of the tail of each mouse (in a painless manner), using shortened tails as the acquired characteristic. You could then
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Tamarin: Principles of Genetics, Seventh Edition
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I. Genetics and the Scientific Method
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1. Introduction
The McGraw Hill Companies, 2001
One
Introduction
BOX 1.1
s the pictures of geneticists throughout this book indicate, science is a very human activity; people living within societies explore scienti c ideas and combine their knowledge. The society in which a scientist lives can affect not only how that scientist perceives the world, but also what that scientist can do in his or her scholarly activities. For example, the United States and other countries decided that mapping the entire human genome would be valuable (see chapter 13). Thus, granting agencies have directed money in this direction. Since much of scienti c research is expensive, scientists often can only study areas for which funding is available. Thus, many scientists are working on the Human Genome Project. That is a positive example of society directing research. Examples also exist in which a societal decision has had negative consequences for both the scientific establishment and the society itself. An example is
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