barcode scanner in asp.net c# Process Etched copper planes in Software

Painting QR in Software Process Etched copper planes

Process Etched copper planes
Denso QR Bar Code Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
QR Code Creator In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create QR image in Software applications.
Technology FR-4/glass, copper clad laminate Polyimide ( filled) copper-clad laminate Polyimide (unfilled) copper-clad laminate Proprietary dielectric (filled) copper-clad laminate Epoxy (filled) copper-clad laminate Ceramic thick-film Photopolymer (filled) Sol gel formation
QR Code Reader In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Creating Quick Response Code In C#
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in .NET applications.
Screen or stencil printed discrete Photoimageable discrete Emerging
QR Encoder In VS .NET
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR Code JIS X 0510 image in ASP.NET applications.
QR Code JIS X 0510 Maker In .NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in VS .NET applications.
HIGH-DENSITY INTERCONNECTION
QR Printer In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET framework Control to generate, create QR-Code image in .NET applications.
Data Matrix Printer In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Software applications.
Copyright 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. Click here for terms of use.
Bar Code Maker In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create barcode image in Software applications.
Code 39 Drawer In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Software applications.
This page intentionally left blank
Painting EAN 13 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create European Article Number 13 image in Software applications.
UCC-128 Creator In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in Software applications.
INTRODUCTION TO HIGH-DENSITY INTERCONNECTION (HDI) TECHNOLOGY
GTIN - 14 Generator In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create EAN - 14 image in Software applications.
EAN / UCC - 14 Encoder In Objective-C
Using Barcode creator for iPad Control to generate, create EAN128 image in iPad applications.
Happy T. Holden
Code-39 Generator In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Java applications.
Painting Matrix Barcode In C#
Using Barcode maker for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
Mentor Graphics, Longmont, Colorado
Barcode Generator In Visual C#
Using Barcode creator for .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in .NET framework applications.
Bar Code Creation In Java
Using Barcode generation for BIRT Control to generate, create bar code image in BIRT applications.
22.1 INTRODUCTION
Bar Code Reader In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Print Data Matrix In Visual C#
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create ECC200 image in .NET applications.
The use of more complex components with very high input/output (I/O) counts has pushed the board fabricator to reexamine techniques for creating smaller vias, and many new or redeveloped processes have appeared on the market. These processes include revised methods of creating holes, such as laser drilling, micro-punching, and mass etching; new methods for additively creating dielectric with via holes using photosensitive dielectric materials; and new methods for metallizing the vias such as conductive adhesives and solid post vias. All of these methods share some common traits. They all allow the designer to increase significantly routing density through the use of vias in surface-mount technology (SMT) pads, to reduce size and weight of product, and to improve the electrical performance of the system. These types of boards are generically called high-density interconnects (HDI). An HDI board typically will have, as an average, over 110 to 130 electrical connections per square inch (20 connections per sq. cm) on both sides of the board.
22.2 DEFINITIONS
Printed wiring boards (PWBs) with microvia hole structures are called different names, such as HDI, SBU (sequential build-up), and BUM (build-up multilayer). However, HDI covers a broader range of high-density wiring boards such as extremely high-layer-count multilayer boards (MLBs) without microvia holes. MLBs with microvia holes are not necessarily built sequentially, nor do they necessarily have build-up structures.These definitions are not appropriate for the discussions in this chapter, and therefore we shall address MLBs with microvia holes simply as microvia hole boards (all microvia hole boards are essentially multilayer boards). Some trade and academic organizations define the microvia hole to be a hole of a certain diameter or less. For example, IPC defines a microvia hole as a hole with a diameter equal to or less than 150 m. However, when a surface blind via (SBV) hole is formed between layer 1 (L1)
Copyright 2008 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. Click here for terms of use.
PRINTED CIRCUITS HANDBOOK
and layer 3 (L3), the diameter of such a hole is typically 250 m in order to facilitate reliable plating, but the hole is still considered a microvia hole. Since all microvia holes are essentially SBVs and are normally small in diameter in order to increase circuit density, it seems more appropriate to define the microvia hole as an SBV without limiting its diameter. As long as a hole has SBV structure, it is defined as a microvia hole throughout this chapter. The first microvia PCB in general production: (a) Hewlett Packard s FINSTRATE was put into production in 1984. It was a copper-core, build-up technology that had direct wirebonded integrated circuits (ICs). After laminating layers of plasma-metalized polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to the copper core, vias were mechanically drilled through the copper core and then insulated with PTFE. Additional through holes were then drilled along with 5 mil blind vias. (b) The first photodielectric microvia board was produced in volume in Japan by IBM-Yasu. This is the SLC technology with two build-up layers on one side of the four conventional FR-4 layers. These can be seen in the 5th Edition of the PCB Handbook, Fig. 21.1. 22.2.1 HDI Characterization This generation of printed boards is characterized by very small blind, buried, and through vias made by techniques other than mechanical drilling. To turn blind vias into buried vias, these process techniques are repeated and the layers are built up, hence the name build-up or sequential build-up circuits (SBU). This type of printed circuits actually started in 1980, when researchers started investigating ways to reduce the size of vias.The first innovator is not known, but some of the earliest pioneers include Larry Burgess of MicroPak Laboratories (developer of LaserVia), Dr. Charles Bauer at Tektronixs (who produced photodielectric vias),1 and Dr. Walter Schmidt at Contraves (who developed plasma-etched vias). Laser-drilled vias were used in mainframe computer multilayers in the late 1970s. These were not as small as the laser-drilled vias today and were produced only in FR-4 with great difficulty and at great cost. The first production build-up or sequential printed boards appeared in 1984, starting with the Hewlett Packard laser-drilled FINSTRATE computer boards, followed in 1991 in Japan with Surface Laminar Circuits (SLC)2 by IBM and in Switzerland with DYCOstrate3 by Dyconex. Figure 21.1 in the 5th Edition of the PCB Handbook shows one of those first Hewlett Packard FINSTRATE boards and one of the first IBM SLC boards. Since the introduction of SLC technology in 1991 (see Chap. 5; Fig. 5.5), many variations of methods for mass producing HDI wiring boards have been developed and implemented. However, if one technology is to be picked as a winner judged in terms of volume produced, laser-drilling technology is the one. Other methods are still used by a number of PWB manufacturers, but in a much smaller scale. The purpose of this chapter is to examine a variety of microvia hole formation technologies, structures, and materials. However, a greater emphasis will be placed on the laser-drilling process (laser via hereafter) since it is the most popular process today and it seems its popularity will grow in the future. It must be understood that via hole formation is just one element of fabricating HDI wiring boards. Fabrication of HDI wiring boards with microvia holes involves many new processes not common to conventional board fabrication. Therefore, additional emphasis will be placed upon these new fabrication processes that are common to other microvia technologies.
Advantages and Benefits Four main factors drive printed boards to require higher wiring densities:
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.