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Definition of Terms The terms in Tables 24.1 and 24.2 are commonly used to describe drilled hole defects observed on copper and substrate surfaces. It is important to be able to identify these defects specifi-
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DRILLING PROCESSES
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TABLE 24.1 Copper Defects Defect Burr Debris Delamination Nail-heading Smearing Definition Ridge left on external surface Drilling residues Separation of the copper from the substrate Burr on internal copper layer Thermomechanically bonded resin deposit Type Mechanical Mechanical Mechanical/heat-related Mechanical/heat-related Heat-related
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TABLE 24.2 Substrate Defects Defect Debris pack Delamination Loose fibers Plowing Smear Voids Definition Drilling residues packed into voids Separation of the substrate layers Unsupported fibers in the hole wall Furrows in the resin Thermomechanically bonded resin deposit Cavities due to torn-out supporting fibers Type Mechanical Mechanical/heat-related Mechanical Heat-related Heat-related Mechanical
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cally rather than in general terms. Using a general term such as roughness may imply voids or plowing. While voids are a mechanical type of defect, plowing is a heat-related type of defect. Therefore, excessive voids would lead one to examine the chip load (infeed rate) used; plowing would lead one to look at surface speed (spindle speed).
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Examples of Drilled Hole Defects Examples of typical drilled hole wall defects are shown in Figs. 24.9 and 24.10.
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FIGURE 24.9 Cross section of drilled hole showing examples of smearing and plowing.
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FIGURE 24.10 Cross section of drilled hole showing examples of nail-heading.
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POSTDRILLING INSPECTION
A wealth of information is available by simply examining the materials from the drilled stack and the drill bits. For instance, inspecting the drill bits will allow one to determine if wear occurs at consistent rates (for drills of same diameter) or will reveal whether hit count maximums are excessive and the type of drilled hole wall defects to expect. Bonded debris and/or extensive wear to the drill corners imply high drilling temperatures (resulting in greater extents of defects such as smearing and plowing) or materials that are not fully cured and point to a problem with the materials (laminate, entry, or backup) or may suggest an excessive surface speed. Extensive primary cutting edge wear indicates abrasive materials and may require lowering stack heights, reducing hit counts, or replacing entry or backup materials. Burrs on the surfaces within the stack mean that there is a problem with the way panels are assembled and pinned or may be the result of warped panels. Entry or exit burrs on the outer laminates should cause one to question the entry and backup materials or the infeed rate. The point of a postdrilling inspection process is that if one takes the time on a regular basis, to examine materials and drill bits after drilling, many drilling problems would be solved before they get out of hand.
DRILLING COST PER HOLE
Material and processing costs, as well as the resulting total drilling cost, may be determined by using an analysis matrix such as a cost model specifically designed for this purpose and generated with the use of a computer spreadsheet program. The advantage of using a spreadsheet is that it allows changes to be made in, for instance, specific material prices and processing times or parameters, and allows instantaneous viewing of the resulting effects on the total drilling costs, the cost per panel, and the average cost per hole. Knowing the cost per hole is important because it allows comparing different jobs or processing situations. Following is a step-by-step description of how to construct a drilling cost analysis matrix such as the one shown in Fig. 24.11.
Machine Time Table A in the drilling cost analysis matrix is used to calculate the total time that is required to complete the job. First, the different drill sizes (a) and their respective total drilled holes per panel (b) as well as the total number of panels (c) to be drilled are determined and entered in the spreadsheet; this allows the spreadsheet to calculate the total number of holes for each size to complete the job (d). Second, using the appropriate drilled stack height (e), the total number of drilled stacks (g) and the total number of drilled hits per drill size (f) can be calculated. The total number of drilled hits (drill strokes) is the total number of drilled holes per panel (b) divided by the number of panels per drilled stack (e). Third, the number of total drilled stacks (g) is divided by the number of stations per machine (stacks per load [h]) to calculate the number of machine loads (i). Fourth, the total drill time per load required per drill size (j) is entered to calculate the total machine time for each drill size (k). Fifth, the total times of each of the drill sizes are simply added up to arrive at the total time required to finish the job. An option is to enter the total drill time per load instead of entering the time for each of the drill sizes and multiplying the total drill time per load by the number of machine loads to determine total machine time.
TABLE A Machine Time a b Number of holes per panel 7,000 5,000 3,125 1,500 800 250 17,675 c Number of drilled panels 120 120 120 120 120 120 d Total number of drilled holes 840,000 600,000 375,000 180,000 96,000 30,000 2,121,000 e Panels per drilled stack 2 2 2 2 2 2 f Total number of drilled hits 420,000 300,000 187,500 90,000 48,000 15,000 g Total number of drilled stacks 60 60 60 60 60 60 h Stacks per machine load 4 4 4 4 4 4 i Number of machine loads 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 15.0 j Drill time per load (h) 1.12 0.80 0.48 0.19 0.10 0.04 2.73 k
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