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Conservation Rinse
rinse
Etch
Strip
unload
FIGURE 26.10 Configuration of an electrophoretic photoresist coater. (Reprinted with permission of J. Dubrava et al., Development of a Novel Positive-Working Electrodeposited Photo Resist Process for the Production of High Density PWB Outerlayers, presentation at the IPC Conference, San Diego, California, Spring 1995.)
Rinsing removes loosely bound material that is returned to the plating cell after ultrafiltration to separate the photoresist and the counterion. This aids in maintaining the ionic balance. After a final water rinse, the panel is dried to remove water and consolidate the film. The film is now tack-free and can be imaged. The chemical composition of the photoresist determines whether the equipment components are made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene, or polyethylene. Electrodes are made of stainless steel and encased in an ion-selective membrane that is flushed to prevent the build-up of counterion migrating there during deposition. The permeate and ultrafiltration unit is important for long-term stability of the coating solution. The coating unit is often enclosed in a clean environment to reduce the amount of particles found in solution or resting on the panel as the process proceeds. 26.6.3.8 Curtain Coating. This method is commonly used to coat liquid solder mask materials. The panel is conveyed at high speed through a vertically falling curtain of the liquid photoresist.The coating width can be adjusted so that the edges are not covered.Temperature and viscosity are controlled for reproducible coatings, and coating thickness is determined by the conveyor speed and the solution flow rate.23 Material in the curtain is returned to the sump and reused, giving very efficient material utilization. This method is one-sided, and the firstside photoresist coating must be partially dried before coating the reverse side. Due to the extra handling required to coat one side at a time and the inability to convey very thin panels through the curtain at high velocity, this method has seen only limited use with photoresist. 26.6.3.9 Screen Coating. Another common method for coating solder mask with either a pattern or flood coverage is screen coating. The screen mesh size and the liquid solution viscosity set the wet coating thickness. The screen is placed above the panel to be coated, and the material is forced through the openings in the screen onto the panel surface, where it forms a film.
PRINTED CIRCUITS HANDBOOK
Equipment is available for either single-side or double-side coating. With single-sided screen printers, the coating must be partially dried before the reverse side is coated. This causes a difference in the solvent content between the two sides that would result in nonuniformity for very precise lithography. In addition, the sequential nature of the coating allows debris and contaminants to be embedded into the first coating. Double-sided screen printers eliminate a drying step and minimize panel handling.The advantages of screen coating are that the equipment is relatively inexpensive to purchase and operate, postage stamp (small embedded areas) coating is possible, and waste is minimized.
Expose Expose is the actual imaging step, reproducing the master pattern in the photoresist.The relief image is created after subsequent development. The expose process elements are phototool generation, registration of the phototool to the panel, and exposure through the phototool by the light source. Light-source alternatives include contact printing, either collimated or uncollimated; proximity printing; projection printing; and laser direct imaging. The noncontact methods separate the phototool from the substrate, reducing yield losses caused by contamination between the phototool and photoresist.With laser direct imaging, there is no phototool and the design data file of the master pattern drives the laser beam to expose the photoresist. Phototools are generated on either film or glass substrates, depending on the feature sizes that are being patterned and the durability required. The panel is either mechanically aligned, with pins holding the phototool with respect to the product, or optically aligned, with alignment features dictating the movement of the phototool and product.The alignment requirements are interrelated to those achieved at composite lamination and drilling. The registration scheme is contained within the exposure equipment. 26.6.4.1 Conventional Imaging 26.6.4.1.1 Artwork Generation. Polyester and glass are the substrates used for phototools. They differ in optical properties, dimensional stability, and durability. Silver halide on polyester is used to create first-generation phototools on a laser plotter. This image is often contact printed onto diazo on polyester to make the copies used in production. Optical absorbance of the different phototool materials versus wavelength is plotted in Fig. 26.11.
0.9 0.8 Absorbance (AU) 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 Optical glass 320 340 360 380 400 420 Wavelength (nm) 440 460 480 500 Polyester Diazo
FIGURE 26.11 Optical absorbance of common phototool materials in the spectral region of PWB photoresist exposure.
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