barcode scanner asp.net mvc SOLDERABILITY: INCOMING INSPECTION AND WET BALANCE TECHNIQUE in Software

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SOLDERABILITY: INCOMING INSPECTION AND WET BALANCE TECHNIQUE
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42.8.2 Solderability Testing and the JSTD-002 A very useful test is specified in the document called Resistance to Dissolution of Metallization. Parts are tested by immersing them in solder at a higher temperature ( 260 C) for an extended period of time and once removed, examination of the deposit is undertaken. This test will certainly catch the thin deposits applied over non-solderable basis metals and will also catch poor surface preparation of solderable basis metals. This test should be used on all non-solderable basis metal components and for all thick film metallization parts and should be used before basic solderability testing is begun. As per the JSTD, the test time for components is typically five seconds. The part is completely immersed into the solder bath and then removed, cleaned, and evaluated for dip and look testing. The part may have wet instantaneously or it may have wet at 4.999 seconds. This is something that can never be discovered via dip and look testing. This wetting time becomes critical if there are differential wetting times between endcap metallizations.When a chip with two endcap metallizations wets inconsistently endcap to endcap, the resultant forces of soldering will cause one end to rise up off the pad and the chip will exhibit the classic tombstone appearance, in which one end of the component becomes detached from the land area and the surface forces on the other end cause the component to stand on end, resembling a tombstone (See Fig. 42.15). Testing of these parts with a wetting balance revealed the problem and, more importantly, gave information to the supplier about the potential root cause of the problem.
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FIGURE 42.15 This shows a test for some surface mount components that pass the five second dip and look test, but clearly show an issue with surface oxides prior to reaching a very acceptable final wetting force. The supplier of these parts, using dip and look testing, certified them to meet solderability requirements but the end customer had line problems.
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FLUXES AND CLEANING
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43.1 INTRODUCTION
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Cell-phones, iPODs, digitial cameras, laptops and desktop computers, DVDs, and indeed all electronic equipment in our world have one thing in common:They each contain an electronic assembly composed of integrated circuits and discrete components soldered to a printed wiring board (PWB) to create an electrically functional circuit. In years gone by, printed circuit assemblies were made exclusively with through-hole components. Today s assemblies contain components that are both through-hole and surface-mount, and some contain unpackaged integrated circuits (ICs) attached directly to the PWB. Except in the case of direct chip attachment by wirebonding or conductive adhesive, the use of a soldering flux to ensure good joining is almost universally practiced. Thus, soldering flux choice has become an important consideration in the manufacturing of electronic assemblies. As electronic product designs have moved to more densely packed PWBs with fine lines and spacing, double-sided surface-mount technology, fine-pitch components, ball grid arrays (BGAs), chip-scale packages (CSPs), stacked packages, etc., the role of the soldering flux has become a critical link in the chain of events required for a successful manufacturing process. In the past, the soldering process was usually followed by a cleaning step to remove flux residues and to ensure the reliability of the assembly. This practice was challenged in the early 1990s by the elimination of a major class of cleaning materials, which had been used for flux residue removal. The targeted cleaning agents include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and methyl chloroform (1,1,1 trichloroethane) that have been shown to destroy stratospheric ozone.1 These were replaced by aqueous detergent cleaners and saponifying agents, and in some cases cleaning was eliminated by the use of low solids or no-clean fluxes. Up to the mid-1970s, the predominant flux chemistry was rosin-based. Today, although rosin fluxes are still in use, great advances have been made in flux chemistries and a large variety of formulations with very different chemistries are being used. The implementation by the European Parliament of Directive 2002/95/EC on the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances (Restriction of Hazardous Substances [RoHS]) in electrical and electronic equipment, including lead in solder, has had significant
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