barcode scanner asp.net mvc FLUX FORM VERSUS SOLDERING PROCESS in Software

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FLUX FORM VERSUS SOLDERING PROCESS
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Although one usually thinks of soldering flux as a liquid, in fact the soldering flux can exist in several different forms. Liquid flux is commonly used for wave-soldering or hand-soldering applications. Paste flux, a thick, viscous flux, is used to hold components to the board prior to reflow of the already present solder. Direct attachment of a solder-bumped chip or BGA packages to solder pads on a PWB is an example of paste flux s usefulness. Also known as tacky soldering fluxes, these materials are useful in repair of area-array devices. Solder paste contains solder paste flux, which is the solder paste without the solder particles. Solder paste is used in surface-mount attachment of components such as chip carriers, quad flat packs (QFPs), BGAs, m-BGAs, CSPs, leaded packages, and discrete resistors and capacitors. Fluxcored solder wire is used for hand-soldering, and flux-coated or flux-cored solder preforms are used as the solder/flux source in some applications such as backplane connector pin reflow soldering. Fluxing underfills can also be considered as a new type of flux material. Many fine-pitch, low-profile array packages suffer from poor reliability due to their low standoff from the substrate, small area of solder interconnection and CTE mismatch with the substrate. Often, a reinforcing material is dispensed around the solder joints after assembly to improve attachment reliability. Fluxing underfills provide fluxing action for the solder process and cure into a hard supporting material during the soldering process, eliminating the need for a post-solder dispensing step.
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FLUXES AND CLEANING
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ROSIN FLUX
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Early flux formulations for electronics used rosin, which is a naturally occurring resin, obtained from the sap of a pine tree. Its exact composition varies depending on the part of the world from it originates as well as the time of the year. Rosin contains a mixture of resin acids, the two most common ones being abietic acid and pimeric acid (see Fig. 43.1). Rosin has been a favorite material for soldering because it liquefies during the soldering process, dissolves the metal salts, and then solidifies when cooled, entrapping and for the most part immobilizing the contaminants. In addition, rosin has some innate fluxing activity since its molecular structure contains a weak organic acid. Finally, rosin-based fluxes work well in hand-soldering and repair operations because rosin provides good heat transfer characteristics. The activity of a rosin-based flux will be determined by the activators and surfactants, which are part of the formulation. Some activators help to remove metal oxide but also leave residues that are essentially noncorrosive. Halide-containing activators leave residues that could be corrosive if too much is left on the board. Military specifications4 in the past have required the use of rosin-based fluxes.These were defined as pure rosin (R), rosin mildly activated (RMA), rosin activated (RA), and rosin super-activated (RSA), based upon the level of halide activators they contained. Typically only R or RMA fluxes FIGURE 43.1 The two most common were approved for high-reliability military applications. In the 1970s, telecommunication companies in the rosin isomers are abietic acid and pimaric acid. United States and Europe predominantly used rosin fluxes for their wave-soldering requirements. These companies had their own internal set of test methods for selecting noncorrosive rosin flux formulations. Using their selection criteria, they believed the fluxes to be sufficiently safe. For their applications, they cleaned only the bottom side of the assembly, where rosin residues needed to be removed to ensure good electrical contact during bed-of-nails testing. In the early 1980s, the IPC developed a flux characterization criteria based on the flux and flux residue activity. Thus, fluxes were classified as: L = low or no flux/flux residue activity M = moderate flux/flux residue activity H = high flux/flux residue activity These designators were determined by a series of tests, including the copper mirror test, a qualitative silver chromate paper test for chlorides and bromides, a qualitative spot test for fluorides, a quantitative test for halides (chloride, bromide, and fluoride), a corrosion test for flux residue activity, and a surface insulation resistance test at accelerated temperature and humidity conditions. The industry standard Requirements for Soldering Fluxes (J-STD-004A) includes a test for electrochemical migration and updates the earlier IPC-SF-818 solder flux specification to include some international elements from the International Standards Organization (ISO9454). In addition to defining the flux categories L, M, and H, it notes the absence or presence of halides by a 0 or 1 that is added to the descriptor. In parallel the international standards, industry standards list the basic chemical constituents as RO (rosin), RE (resin), OR (organic), or IN (inorganic) (see Table 43.4).5 The test methods for this specification are contained in the Test Methods Document (IPC-TM-650).6
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