asp net display barcode h = rnl(PO - Pl) = rnn(P1 - Pz) = m1m(po - Pz) ml + m2 in Visual Studio .NET

Encoder Denso QR Bar Code in Visual Studio .NET h = rnl(PO - Pl) = rnn(P1 - Pz) = m1m(po - Pz) ml + m2

h = rnl(PO - Pl) = rnn(P1 - Pz) = m1m(po - Pz) ml + m2
QR-Code Reader In VS .NET
Using Barcode Control SDK for .NET framework Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
QR-Code Encoder In .NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR Code image in .NET applications.
(7.2)
Decoding Quick Response Code In .NET Framework
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Bar Code Generator In VS .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET applications.
The gain with both loops open is the partial derivative in terms of m: c3h am 1 nl2 = m&h7 - 7-d ml + m2
Barcode Reader In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
QR Code 2d Barcode Creation In C#
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
m;Iy(y --$ = (PO - P2) (*2)2
QR Code 2d Barcode Creator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create QR image in ASP.NET applications.
QR Code ISO/IEC18004 Encoder In VB.NET
Using Barcode printer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create QR-Code image in .NET applications.
(7.3) The gain with the pressure loop closed is in terms of p,:
Generating Code128 In .NET
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code-128 image in .NET applications.
Matrix Barcode Generation In .NET
Using Barcode creation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
-1 = PO - P l = (PO - Pz) (Aam1 p ah
Printing ECC200 In .NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in .NET framework applications.
Printing Code 93 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create USS 93 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
(7.4)
GTIN - 12 Generation In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create UPC A image in iPhone applications.
Bar Code Creation In C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in VS .NET applications.
Then,
Create 1D Barcode In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create 1D image in VS .NET applications.
Generate Code 128A In VS .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Reporting Service applications.
Gain may also be espressed in terms of pressure, by substituting for ml and m2 from Eq. (7.2): Xhl = PO - PI PO - P2 In the same manner, Ah2 can be found: Xnz = Pl - P2 PO - P2 (7.6) (7.5)
Encoding Linear 1D Barcode In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create 1D Barcode image in Java applications.
Bar Code Drawer In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
Using the following expressions for pl, the other gains can be determined:
Barcode Generator In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create barcode image in Java applications.
EAN / UCC - 13 Generation In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Java applications.
P*=Po--$P,+&= 1 mlp0 + m2p2 7n1 + m2
The resulting matrix is:
h---p
PO - Pl Pl - pz PO - Pz PO - pz Pl - Pz PO - Pl ~ ~ I---PO - Pz po - p2
(7.7)
Choice of particular c-m pairs for this application depends on the pressure distribution. The matris indicates that the valve with the greater pressure drop is better for flow control. But if p, is midway between po and pi, all elements in the matrix are 0.5, so it does not matter which pairs are chosen.
Multivariable Process Control 1
The sum of each row and each column is unity-this is one of the features of the relative-gain matrix. In a 2 by 2 matrix such as (7.7), it is only necessary to solve for one element, the others being equal or complementary.
example 7.4
Another common two-loop process is the blending system shown in Fig. 7.4. Two streams, X and Y, are blended to a specified total flow F of composition 2. Let the flow of stream X be designated ml and the flow of stream Y be m2. The following equations describe the process:
F=ml+m2=~= X-
ml _ i-m
l - x ml -=l-!l$ F
(7.8) (7.9)
Only one element of the matrix need be found: (7.10) (7.11) The matrix then takes on the appearance:
g--g+
(7.12)
For values of x less than 0.5, m, should be used for composition control and m2 for flow control. There is no limit to the number of variables that can be displayed by a matrix, although some difficulties may be encountered in making the differentiations. To this extent, an analog computer would be helpful. Or a numerical solution may be found by incrementing each manipulated variable, although general solutions like those above have more value. Instead of using mathematical models, as was done here, an existing plant may be tested to generate a matrix of gains. This requires a series
FIG 7.4. A typical two-component blending system in which both total flow and composition are to be controlled.
1Multiple-loop Systems
of open-loop tests, in which ml is first incremented and changes in all the controlled variables observed. Then open-loop gains (Ac,/Am,),, and so on, can be calculated. The other manipulated variables are then incremented and their effects calculated in the same manner. Fortunately it is not necessary to make closed-loop tests to determine (Ac,/A&, since enough data have already been gathered. AIatrix manipulation can do the rest. Let the values of (ACi/Amj), be arrayed in a matrix identified as M. A complementary matrix C, of elements (AVtj/ACi),, can be generated by inverting, then transposing matrix M : C = (M- )T (7.13)
Rules for performing this operation can be found in reference (5) and in most texts on modern algebra. Finally, each relative-gain term Xij is found by wcultiplying each element in matrix M by its corresponding element in the complementary matrix C. It is also possible to prepare a matrix of relative gains from the elements (ACi/Amj), alone. The procedure is the same as that described by Eq. (7.13), except that the elements of matrix M are inverted, i.e., they appear as (A nj/Aci),.
Coupling
Whenever a single manipulated variable can significantly affect, two or more controlled variables, the latter are said to be coupled. This interaction between control loops can be troublesome. Some variables are difficult enough to control without being subject to upsets from other loops. For this reason, proposed composition loops should always be examined for evidence of coupling. When the gain matrix contains numbers approaching 1 and 0, the loops will be largely independent. But values approaching 0.5 indicate a strong mutual coupling. To gain an appreciation of the effects of coupling, consider the pressureflow system of Fig. 7.3. Let p, be midway between p, and p2, so that all elements in the gain matrix equal 0.5. The flow cont roller will manipul a t e m2. With the pressure controller in manual, the flow controller could be adjusted as if it were alone, i.e., as if there were no coupling. And, in fact, there would be no coupling because only one loop is closed. But under these circumstances, any change in po, pz, or flow would affect pl. Next, think of the pressure controller being in automatic, but with a wide band and long reset-i.e., very loose settings. But should the set point of the flow controller be changed, pressure will be upset nearly as much as when its loop was open. The pressure error will eventually be
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.