barcode reading in asp.net PROCESS in Software

Creation Code 128 Code Set A in Software PROCESS

PROCESS
USS Code 128 Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Code-128 Drawer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Code 128B image in Software applications.
APPLICATIONS
Read Code 128C In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Create Code-128 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code 128C image in VS .NET applications.
-160 -2wI 0.1 0.2 0.4 1.0 2.0 4.0 w, rad/sec FIGURE 21-10 Bode diagram of heat exchanger for variation in temperature (Cohen and Johnson).
Print Code 128B In .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128C image in ASP.NET applications.
Encoding Code 128 Code Set C In .NET
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in .NET framework applications.
Notice that the theory predicts an interesting resonance effect at higher frequencies. The resonance effect has been observed experimentally in a steam-towater exchanger. See Lees and Hougen (1956). Unfortunately, the experimental data of Cohen and Johnson do not extend to sufficiently high frequencies to exhibit resonance. The reader is referred to the original article for further details.
USS Code 128 Creator In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create Code-128 image in .NET framework applications.
Make Code 3 Of 9 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Software applications.
SUMMARY
Making Data Matrix ECC200 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Software applications.
Paint Barcode In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
In this chapter, several complex systems have been analyzed mathematically. The result of each analysis was a set of equations (algebraic and/or differential) that presumably describe the dynamic response of the system to one or more disturbances. The process of obtaining the set of equations is often called modeling, and the set of equations is referred to as the mathematical model of the system. In general, the model is based on the physics and chemistry of the system. For example, in the analysis of a heat exchanger, one may write that the heat flux through a wall is equal to a convective transfer coefficient times a temperature driving force. For a process not well understood, there is little chance that an accurate model can be obtained from the theoretical approach used here. For such systems, a direct dynamic test can be made. To do this, a known disturbance such as a pulse, step, or sinusoidal input is applied and the response recorded. This approach was discussed in Chap. 19. On the other hand, a model based on a theoretical analysis is extremely valuable, for it means that the system is well understood and that the effect of changes in system design and operation can be predicted. The analysis of a steam-jacketed kettle provided an example of a nonlinear system containing nonlinear functions of several variables. The problem was handled by linearizing these functions about an operating point and ultimately obtaining a block diagram of the system from which the transfer function of the control system could be obtained. Although this approach is relatively straight-
USS Code 128 Generator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Software applications.
Drawing EAN 13 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in Software applications.
THEORETICAL
Making Leitcode In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create Leitcode image in Software applications.
Code 3 Of 9 Printer In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 39 image in Font applications.
ANALYSIS
UPC-A Recognizer In Java
Using Barcode decoder for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
USS Code 39 Maker In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creator for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in ASP.NET applications.
COMPLEX
Reading ANSI/AIM Code 39 In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
Encoding Code 128 Code Set A In VB.NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in .NET framework applications.
PROCESSES
Barcode Reader In C#.NET
Using Barcode scanner for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
Painting USS Code 128 In Objective-C
Using Barcode encoder for iPhone Control to generate, create Code-128 image in iPhone applications.
forward, the resulting linear model can only be used over a narrow range of variables. The analysis of the gas absorber gave some insight into the dynamic character of a typical multistage process that is widely used in the chemical process industries. A linear analysis of an n-plate column leads to IZ ordinary differential equations, which combine to give an overdamped nth-order response. Nonlinearities may be present in this system in such forms as a product of flow and concentration or a nonlinear equilibrium relationship. When changes in inlet flow occur, a set of differential equations describing the dynamics of the liquid flow must be added to those describing mass transfer. When the change of plate efficiency with flow is considered, the model of a gas absorber becomes even more complex. Most of the design techniques developed in the past for multistage operations (gas absorption, distillation, etc.) have applied to steady-state operation. The dynamic analysis of such processes calls for dynamic parameters that are usually unavailable. For example, the liquid-flow dynamics of trays used in distillation towers are relatively unknown. The discussion of distributed-parameter systems further illustrated the complexities that can arise in physical systems. The distributed-parameter systems lead to partial differential equations, which may be very difficult to solve for most of the forcing functions of practical interest. However, we saw that the response of distributed-parameter systems to sinusoidal forcing functions can be obtained directly by application of the substitution rule, in which s is replaced by jw. A distributed-parameter system features nonminimum phase lag characteristics. This is in sharp contrast to the lumped-parameter systems for which the phase angle approaches a limit at infinite frequency. As systems are analyzed in mom detail and with fewer assumptions, the models that describe them become more complex, although more accurate. To predict the response of the system from the model requires that equations of the model be solved for some specific input disturbance. The only practical way to solve a complex model is to use a computer. This method of solving the mathematical model is often called computer simulation. The computer response will resemble that of the physical system if the model is accurate. In the last section of this text, the computer and its use to simulate control systems will be discussed in considerable detail.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.