barcode reader integration with asp.net [ -f -;I B=[i in Software

Paint Code 128 Code Set C in Software [ -f -;I B=[i

[ -f -;I B=[i
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Paint Code-128 In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Software applications.
STATE-SPACE
Reading Code 128C In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Code 128 Code Set B Drawer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in .NET applications.
METHODS
Encode Code 128 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code128 image in ASP.NET applications.
Encode Code 128 Code Set C In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
FIGURE 29-1
Encode ANSI/AIM Code 128 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create Code128 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Painting UCC.EAN - 128 In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in Software applications.
Liquid-level system for Example 29.2: Al = 1, A2 = 0.5, R1 = 0.5, R2 = 2/3.
GTIN - 13 Creator In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Software applications.
Draw Code128 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Software applications.
From the definition of the transfer function matrix of Eq. (29.17), we write G(s) = (sI-A)- B
Painting Data Matrix ECC200 In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Software applications.
Bar Code Maker In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
The inverse of (~1 - A) is obtained as follows (see Appendix 28A for details on the inversion of a matrix): (+A)- adj(.rI - A) = ,sI-A, ] s+3 cofactor of (~1 - A) ,= We can now find the adjoint: adj(s1 - A) = The determinant of (~1 - A) is s+3 4 0
Make GS1 - 12 In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create UPC-E Supplement 5 image in Software applications.
Code 128C Printer In Objective-C
Using Barcode creation for iPad Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in iPad applications.
s+2 1
Linear 1D Barcode Printer In VB.NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create Linear Barcode image in .NET applications.
Code 128C Encoder In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in Reporting Service applications.
s-t-3 o
Barcode Generation In Objective-C
Using Barcode drawer for iPhone Control to generate, create barcode image in iPhone applications.
DataMatrix Creation In VB.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET framework Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in .NET applications.
4 s+2 I
USS Code 128 Creator In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Java applications.
Painting EAN / UCC - 13 In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create EAN-13 Supplement 5 image in Java applications.
We can now determine the inverse of (~1 - A).
(sl - A)-1 =
s+3 4
0 s+2
(s + 2)(s + 3)
(29.21)
G(s) =
s+3 0 s+2 4 (s + 2)(s + 3)
0 2 =
s+3 0 4 2(s + 2) I (s + 2)(s + 3)
TRANSFER FUNCTION MATRIX
Simplifying
this
expression
gives 0 2 s+3
1 s+2 G(s) = 4 _ (s + 2)(s + 3) From Eq. (29.16) we write H(s) = G(s)&) therefore
HZ(S) Hl@)
s+2 4 _ (s + 2)(s + 3)
U26) Ul(S)
(29.22)
From Eq. (29.22), we obtain
HI(S) = -&MS)
Hz(s) = (s + 2)(s + ,) h(s)
+ &uzw
For given inputs, the above equations may be inverted to obtain h l(t) and h2(t). For the case of Ul(s) = l/s and Us = 0, we get 1 0.5 HI(S) = - = s(OSs + 1) s(s + 2) 4 s(s + 2)(s + 3)
H2(s)
Inversion of HI(S) and Hz(s) gives hi(f) = OS(1 - C+) /q(t) = (2/3) 1 - 0.5(3e-2 - 2e-3r [ )I The results given above can be obtained, of course, by the methods presented earlier in this book. The transition matrix can be obtained by applying Eq. (29.13) to Eq. (29.21):
= L-l
il- -:
0 4 (s + s+2 + 3) 2)(s 1 s+3
STATE-SPACE METHODS
Inverting each term in the matrix gives
,At ,-2t
qe-2 - e-3t)
0 e-3t
This matrix can be used in Eq. (29.8) to calculate hr(t) and hz(t). The result will be the same as obtained by inversion of Eq, (29.22).
SUMMARY
The matrix differential equation i = Ax + Bu .
used to describe a control system by the state-space method can be solved for the vector of state variables (x) by use of the transfer function matrix. It consists of a matrix of transfer functions that relate the state variables to the inputs. The transfer function matrix serves the same purpose in a multiple-input multiple-output system as the transfer function does for a single-input single-output system. The transfer function matrix is obtained from the matrix differential equatien by application of *m Laplace transforms.
PROBLEMS
29.1. Determine x(t) for the system
i = Ax + Bu
where eAr = I e;t
-,-2t + ,-fit ,-2t
x(O) =[ 1I
u(t)=[;]
B=[;
2 -4
MULTIVARIABLE CONTROL
UR to this point, the fundamentals of process dynamics and control have been illustrated by single-input single-output (SISO) systems. The processes encountered in the real world are usually multiple-input multiple-output systems (MIMO). To explore these concepts, consider the interacting, two-tank liquid-level system in 7 Rig. 30.1 where there is one input, the flow to tank 1 (m 1) and one output, the : &vel in tank 2 (hz). In this figure, h2 is related to m i by a second-order transfer function. From the point of view of a SISO system, the relation between h2 and ml may be represented by the block diagram in Fig. 30.lb. One may place a feedback control system around the open-loop system of Fig. 30. lb to maintain control of Hz. , ., Now consider the same process of Fig. 30.1 in which there are two inputs * $n~ .and m2) and t wo outputs (h i and h2). This system is shown in Fig. 30.2~. ; A: change in m 1 alone will affect both outputs (h 1 and h2). A change in rn2 alone will also change both outputs. (Remember that this is an interacting process .for which the level in tank. 1 is affected by the level in tank 2.) The interaction T. between inputs and outputs can be seen more clearly by the block diagram of Fig. : 30.2b, In this diagram, the transfer functions show how the change in one of the : inputs affects both of the outputs. For example, if a change occurs in only 441, %he responses of Hi and Hz are . . : / HI(S) 7 G&)MI(s) : // i . .%. .. ,G$ : H2(~3 .= G21bM41(~) s .. , $ I he transfer functions in Fig. 30.2b will be worked out for a specific set of pro\ :: cess parameters in Example 30.1. (If the tanks were noninteracting, G 12 = 0, with .*
k ;.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.