barcode reader using c#.net K,=O.2 WC in Software

Printer USS Code 128 in Software K,=O.2 WC

K,=O.2 WC
Code 128 Code Set B Reader In None
Using Barcode Control SDK for Software Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Software applications.
Code128 Generator In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code 128A image in Software applications.
1 0.2r2+WS+1
USS Code 128 Decoder In None
Using Barcode reader for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Print Code128 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode drawer for .NET Control to generate, create Code128 image in VS .NET applications.
FIGURE P15-7
Printing Code 128B In .NET Framework
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in ASP.NET applications.
ANSI/AIM Code 128 Maker In VS .NET
Using Barcode maker for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set B image in .NET applications.
LINEAR
Code 128 Creation In VB.NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 128A image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
Create DataMatrix In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Software applications.
CLOSED-LOOP
Create GS1 - 12 In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in Software applications.
Paint Barcode In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create bar code image in Software applications.
SYSTEMS
Creating USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Software applications.
Printing UPC - 13 In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create GS1 - 13 image in Software applications.
15.8. Draw the root-locus diagram for the proportional control of a plant having the transfer function 2/[(s + 1)3]. Determine the roots on the imaginary axis and the corresponding value of K,. 15.9. (a) Show how you would adopt the usual root-locus method for variation in controller gain to the problem of obtaining the root-locus diagram for variation in TD for the control system shown in Fig. Pl5.9 for K, = 2. (b) Plot the root-locus diagram for variation in rD with K, = 2. (c) Determine the response of the system C(t) for a unit-step change in R for TD = 0.5, and K, = 2. Sketch the response. What is the ultimate value of C(t) Hint: Rearrange the open-loop transfer function to be in the form G(s) =
ISSN - 13 Creation In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create International Standard Serial Number image in Software applications.
Bar Code Generator In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPhone Control to generate, create barcode image in iPhone applications.
s* + 1.5s + 1.5
DataMatrix Printer In None
Using Barcode creator for Excel Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Office Excel applications.
Scan UPC Code In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
Then apply the usual root-locus rules with rD taking the place of K,.
Draw 1D In VB.NET
Using Barcode generator for VS .NET Control to generate, create 1D image in .NET applications.
Barcode Maker In .NET Framework
Using Barcode printer for ASP.NET Control to generate, create barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
FIGURE P15-9
Code 128 Code Set C Generation In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Code 128A image in Reporting Service applications.
DataMatrix Maker In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in Font applications.
PART
FREQUENCY RESPONSE
CHAPTER
INTRODUCTION TOFREQUENCY RESPONSE
s 5 and 8 discussed briefly the response of first- and second-order systems to sinusoidal forcing functions. These frequency responses were derived by using the standard Laplace transform technique. In this chapter, a convenient graphical technique will be established for obtaining the frequency response of linear systems. The motivation for doing so will become apparent in the following chapter, where it will be found that frequency response is a valuable tool in the analysis and design of control systems. Many of the calculations in this chapter make use of complex numbers. The reader should review the two forms of complex numbers (rectangular and polar) and the basic operations used on complex numbers.
SUBSTITUTION RULE A Fortunate Circumstance
Consider a simple first-order system with transfer function G(s) = -& (16.1)
Substituting the quantity jw for s in Eq. (16.1) gives G(jw) = 1 jor+l 201
FREQUENCYRESPONSE
We may convert this expression to polar form by multiplying numerator and denominator by the conjugate of (jar + 1); the result is: -jw7 + 1 1 .07 Ww) = (j w-r + l)(--jar + 1) = 1 + 0272 - 1 1 + 0272 (16.2)
To convert a complex number in rectangular form (z = a + jb) to polar form (I z 142) one uses the relationships: 1 z I= Ja2+b2 and &z, = tan- $
Applying these relationships to Eq. (16.2) gives G(jo) = J&T The quantities on the right side of Eq. (16.3) are familiar. In Chap. 5 we found that, after sufficient time had elapsed, the response of a first-order system to a sinusoidal input of frequency w is also a sinusoid of frequency w. Furthermore, we saw that the ratio of the amplitude of the response to that of the input is l/ &%% and the phase difference between output and input is tan- ( --or). Hence, we have shown here that for the frequency response of a first-order system, Phase angle = r;G(jw) That is, to obtain the amplitude ratio (AR) and phase angle, one merely substitutes jw for s in the transfer function and then takes the magnitude and argument (or angle) of the resulting complex number, respectively.
Example 16.1. Rework Example 5.2. The pertinent transfer function is
G(s) = 1
& tan- ( -07)
(16.3)
0.1s + 1 cycledmin which
The frequency of the bath-temperature variation is given as lO/rr is equivalent to 20 rad/min. Hence, let s = 20j to obtain 1 G(20j) = ~ 2j + 1 In polar form, this is G(20j) = 5 4 - 63.5 which agrees with the previous result.
INTRODUCTION
TO FREQUENCY RESPONSE
Generalization
At this point, it is necessary to ascertain whether or not we may generalize the result of the last section to other systems. This can be done by checking the result for second-order systems, third-order systems, etc. However, it is more satisfying to prove the general validity of the result as follows. (The reader may, if desired, accept the result as general and skip to Example 16.2. We remark here that an important restriction on this rule is that it applies only to systems whose transfer functions yield stable responses.) An nth-order linear system is characterized by an nth-order differential equation:
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.