read barcode from image c#.net START condition, slave address byte, command byte/output data byte pair, and a STOP in Software

Creation Code 128 in Software START condition, slave address byte, command byte/output data byte pair, and a STOP

1. START condition, slave address byte, command byte/output data byte pair, and a STOP
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2. START condition, slave address byte, command byte, STOP condition, or 3. START condition, slave address byte, multiple command byte/output data byte pairs,
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STOP condition. Figure 6.28 illustrates how to connect up to 4 MAX521s on a single bus from the host. The four devices are distinguished by the different addresses set on the AD0 and AD1 lines. Each of the MAX521 compares these bits with the address bits in the address byte transmission from the host. Figure 6.29 illustrates how an AT90S2313 AVR processor can be connected to a MAX521 DAC to provide up to 8 channels of 8-bit DAC. The I2C protocol that the MAX521 DAC understands can be created on any I/O line of the processor, and the processor can communicate to the MAX521 chip under software control.
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130 Slave Address Byte Command Byte Output Data Byte SDA MSB LSB ACK MSB LSB ACK MSB LSB ACK SCL 1 2 3 7 8 9 1 2 8 9 1 2 8 9 Start Condition Stop Condition
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Figure 6.26 Communication format for MAX521 serial DAC. All transmission begins with a START condition and ends with a STOP condition.
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0 (MSB) SDA
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(MSB)
(LSB)
Command Byte
Figure 6.27 Structure of the Address and Command bytes.
132 HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE INTERFACING WITH THE AVR
TABLE 6-3 BIT NAME
BITS OF THE COMMAND BYTE FOR MAX521 FUNCTION
R2, R1, R0 RST PD A2, A1, A0 ACK
Reserved bits. Set to 0. RESET bit. A 1 on this bit resets all DAC registers. Power Down bit. A 1 on this bit put MAX521 in a power down mode. A 0 returns the MAX521 to normal state. Address bits. Defines address of the DAC to which the subsequent data byte will be addressed. Acknowledgment bit. Set to 0.
6.9 Interfacing LED Displays
Displays are an important component in an embedded system. They are one of the most popular ways to communicate with the system user. There are many types of display devices that can be used and interfaced with the AVR processor.
SEVEN-SEGMENT DISPLAYS
The simplest display device is, of course, a LED and we have already seen how it can be connected and used with the AVR. But it can provide limited information to the user. A LED seven-segment display, on the other hand, can be used to provide numeric information. It requires eight signal lines if possible and at least seven at the minimum. The display has seven LEDs labeled a through g and then there is a decimal point. Figure 6.30 illustrates a scheme to connect two LED seven-segment displays to the AVR processor. This puts an immense resource load on the processor. Interfacing a couple of sevensegment displays takes up all the I/O pins. The situation is remedied by using a multiplex scheme. Here, at the cost of increased software complexity, some of the I/O pins can be saved while at the same time more displays can be added. This scheme has the advantage that our eye cannot follow any light change faster than about 20 Hz. So if an LED display is put on and off at a rate greater than 20 Hz, due to the persistence property of the eye, it will not feel any difference, provided that the average intensity of the LED is maintained. Thus, many LED displays can share the same I/O lines, with only one of them being lit at any time. Figure 6.31 illustrates how four LED displays can connect to the AVR controller using the multiplex scheme. The power to each display (common anode type display) is controlled by an output signal line of the AVR through a PNP transistor switch. A 0 at the base turns it ON and provides voltage to the display. At any given time, only one of the transistors is turned ON. Once a ve voltage is applied to a display, the cathodes being connected to port lines, the pattern of 1 s and 0 s on the port will determine which LED segment glows. A 0 on the port will sink the current from the segment and the segment will glow. The seven-segment LED displays cannot be used to display alphabets (well, only a limited number of alphabets can be displayed). To display aphanumeric information, there are alphanumeric displays available which have sixteen segments as illustrated in Figure 6.32.
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