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204 PROTOTYPING TECHNIQUES
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at IUCAA prefer single, tinned copper wire with Teflon insulation. The advantage of using Teflon insulated wires is that the insulation is very sturdy and can be routed in any manner, between IC pads, on the PCB without having to worry about damage while soldering other components. A Teflon-insulated wire is also more mechanically robust than the plastic counterpart. A major difficulty with Teflon wires is in stripping the Teflon insulation. To strip these Teflon-insulated wires efficiently, a special stripping tool is available from Radio Shack and other vendors. This stripping tool has an adjustable strip diameter and length and can be used from all wire gauges from 10 to 30 SWG (or corresponding AWG). 7. It is useful to put in suitable test points on the prototype to ease probing with a voltmeter/logic-analyzer/oscilloscope. A general rule for distributing the test points is on the input, output, and control signals of the prototype, selected with discretion. 8. Once the fabrication is complete, a good idea is to verify the connections and to ensure that all the connections are in good shape. Many bad, dry solder joints are known to cause unimaginable problems. 9. At this point, you are ready to apply power and to run some test code. With an onboard microcontroller, a simple beginner s test is to look for a proper system clock. This test does not require any code to be run on the microcontroller. Next would be to see if the system reset functions properly. It is important to catalog the system responses to test code and patterns applied to the prototype. A bottoms-up approach would be to run a series of test codes with increasing integration of system functions. Figure 9.4 and 9.5 are photographs of component and solder sides of a prototype under construction. Note a tantalum capacitor soldered directly on the pins of an IC in 9.5.
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FIGURE 9-4 Component site photograph of a prototype under fabrication.
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STEPS FOR PROTOTYPING 205
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FIGURE 9-5 Solder side photograph of a prototype under fabrication.
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AVR PROJECT 1
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SMART DICE: A DICE WITH AN ATTITUDE
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10.1 At a Glance
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Salient features of this chapter are:
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An elementary project that you can build in a couple of hours. Uses an AT90S1200 and sundry components. Discusses alternative designs. Shows how to write code in a variety of ways. Shows how to modify the circuit and code for an 8-pin AT90S2343.
10.2 Introduction
With this chapter, we begin the last section of the book, that of projects. I will illustrate the various features of the Atmel AVR RISC controllers with a series of practical applications that can be used right away or can be used in a larger project.
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208 AVR PROJECT 1
I have arranged the projects in order of an increasing complexity. It all starts off with a simple project using an AT90S1200. The project described in this chapter is an electronic dice. It really is a single-chip project using an AT90S1200, seven LEDs, two switches, and a handful of other components to give a modern-look dice. The circuit and the code can be easily modified for an AT90S2343 to reduce board size and components. In the end, I have touched on this issue of modifying the code and the hardware just a little bit to run off an AT90S2343.
10.3 Design Issues: Specifying the Requirement
Before we embark on any project, it is a good idea to write down in detail what we are looking for. What do we expect and what would it take to achieve our objective Putting things in black and white is a good habit not only if you are a one-person team but more so if you are working in a larger group. Now, this project is about building an electronic dice. The device should have an input switch, and upon pressing the switch, a number (selected randomly by the controller) between 1 and 6 should be displayed. The dice display could be built in various ways. You could have a 7-segment display that would display the number (between 1 to 6) when you press a key, or you could have 7 ordinary LEDs arranged as illustrated in Figure 10.1, and as is also the case in a traditional dice. We would also like to have the display blank off momentarily after the switch for when a new number is pressed. This gives feedback to the user that the switch press was recognized by the processor. In the absence of this blanking feature, if the user presses a switch and the next number happens to be the same as the last one, the user may not recognize that. Other requirements could be that the circuit should consume as little power as possible and should be as compact as can be. To minimize the power consumption requirement, we could do two things:
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