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4 INTRODUCTION
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FIGURE 1.1 A digital circuit implemented using TTL ICs.
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FIGURE 1.2 The digital circuit in Figure 1.1 implemented using a PLD.
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WHY THE ATMEL S AVR MICROCONTROLLER 5
AT90S1200
A B C D
PB0 PB1 PB2 PB3 PB4 Output
FIGURE 1.3 An AVR microcontroller-based implementation for the logic equation.
be programmed correctly. The program to implement our logic equation is discussed in a later chapter. While we are trying to portray the microprocessor circuit in a positive light, it is worthwhile to be able to remember the relative merits and demerits of each implementation. It is not that the microprocessor is the solution to all problems. Sometimes you need to use a PLD in conjunction with a processor, and sometimes a PLD alone is required. One such implementation of a processor and a PLD working together is the subject of a later chapter.
1.3 Why the Atmel s AVR Microcontroller
Whether a particular requirement needs to be implemented using discrete ICs or PLDs or a microprocessor must be determined by the designer. However, many applications could be suitably implemented using microcontrollers, and a great many of them would benefit from using the AVR as outlined briefly below. We will discuss the AVR features in detail in later chapters, but at this point it may be useful to outline the salient features. Atmel s AVR RISC family of controllers has the following features:
1. RISC architecture with mostly fixed-length instruction, load-store memory access, 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
and 32 general-purpose registers. A two-stage instruction pipeline that speeds up execution. Majority of instructions take one clock cycle. Up to 10-MHz clock operation. Wide variety of on-chip peripherals, including digital I/O, ADC, EEPROM, Timer, UART, RTC timer, pulse width modulator (PWM), etc. Internal program and data memory. In-system programmable. Available in 8-pin to 64-pin package size to suit wide variety of applications. Up to 12 times performance speedup over conventional CISC controllers.
6 INTRODUCTION
10. Wide operating voltage from 2.7 V to 6.0 V . 11. A simple architecture offers a small learning curve to the uninitiated.
What does the name AVR stand for Atmel says that it is just a name. However, AVR seems to have the initials of the people who designed the controller.
1.4 Organization of This Book
The book has three logical sections:
1. Introduction and preliminary discussion about microcontrollers and AVR controller
details. These are covered in s 1 to 4.
2. System design using the AVR RISC controllers. Issues include system design, code
development, software and hardware interfacing the AVR to the outside world. These aspects are covered in s 5 to 9. 3. Sample applications are covered in the rest of the chapters, and these illustrate how the AVR controller could be used in real applications. The idea is to present the material in a format that is easily accessible to readers of varying interests. Beginners could start from the initial chapters and work their way up till the very end. An individual with some experience with microcontrollers could, on the other hand, skip the initial chapters in Section 1 and pick up where new material is presented. However, the last section on applications could be a starting point for beginners as well as experienced users to give perspective. The sample applications illustrate the various ways in which this versatile family of controllers could be used and could well be a starting point for a beginner. The middle sections deal with the specifics of the AVR controller family and how to get an application up and running, how to develop code, and the various tools available in the form of assemblers, compilers, simulators, evaluation and prototyping boards. I have sampled a few of these commercial and freeware offerings, and I present my opinion about these products in these sections.
1.5 Timing Diagram Conventions
Timing diagrams are the key to understanding digital circuits and systems. Timing diagrams illustrate how the signals of a circuit vary as a function of time, as well as the interplay between the signals. They are the starting point in describing the way a circuit or a system ought to work, and after a circuit has been designed, the timing diagrams tell the readers how the circuit or the system works. In turn, if this circuit is being used as a subsystem in a larger design, its associated timing diagram will determine how it fits into the larger system or how the larger system is to be designed to accommodate the smaller subcircuit. (Figure 1.4.)
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