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MPLAB ICD 2 USB I/F Asynch Serial
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ICD 2 Debugger Circuitry
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PC Running MPLAB IDE
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Figure 5.4 The ICD 2 debugger interface allows the PIC microcontroller to work as if it were an emulator.
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EMULATORS AND DEBUGGERS
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Application Memory
Figure 5.5 PIC microcontroller emulator implemented using a bondout chip that is connected to custom hardware controlled by a PC running MPLAB IDE.
MPLAB ICE-2000
Microchip s MPLAB ICE 2000 emulator (Fig. 5.6) is close to the ultimate tool for understanding the operation of a PIC microcontroller application. The MPLAB ICE 2000 consists of a roughly 7in by 6in box (pod) that is about 0.75in deep (it is surprisingly small) and connects to an unregulated DC power source, a PC s parallel port, and a processor module. The processor module is similar to a PCMCIA (PC-card) circuit, with a 15in ribbon cable leading from it to a product connector that is connected to a device adapter or transition socket. This hardware organization is shown in Fig. 5.7 and should give you an idea of how simple the connections are. To make it easier to interface to the target system, the MPLAB ICE 2000 includes a small tripod
Figure 5.6 The Microchip MPLAB ICE 2000 emulator provides you with the ability to truly see inside your executing application.
MPLAB ICE-2000
Figure 5.7 The device adapter plugs into the MPLAB ICE 2000 pod as shown here.
to raise the pod over the circuit under test and minimize the mechanical stress on the device adapter cable and the PIC microcontroller socket, resulting in a reliable electrical connection. The MPLAB ICE 2000 is the second generation emulator from Microchip; the earlier tool was much bulkier, more expensive, and had a large, heavy, and in exible cable linking the emulated PIC microcontroller to the control hardware. The MPLAB-ICE 2000 has the following list of impressive features and can emulate the entire PIC microcontroller line, including some of the latest PIC18 devices:
Programmable internal clock able to provide clocks for the emulated devices running
from 32 KHz to 40 MHz
Full 2V to 5.5V operating voltage operation Breakpoints on execution address, internal device address, register contents, or exter
nal events Complex breakpoints can be built out of four different breakpoint sources 32K of trace memory Oscilloscope/logic analyzer input/output Processor modules/device adapters/transition sockets for all classes of PIC microcontrollers
The programmable clock is a very nice feature to have because it gives you what if capability to look at how the application could be implemented for various clocking schemes. This can be especially useful for looking at different ways of implementing applications. The various breakpoint options bear a few comments and their usefulness is probably not readily apparent when you rst look at the capability. As you work through applications, you will nd events that you want to understand happening in the middle of the application and that can be very hard to trigger on. An example of this would be a PIC microcontroller application that is communicating with another device and seems to have a problem in the fourth communications
EMULATORS AND DEBUGGERS
packet. In a traditional system, to trigger on this, you would either need a very long delay or you would have to develop some hardware to look for the speci c event (I ve done both over the years). With the MPLAB ICE 2000, you can set up where you want to trigger algorithmically and then wait for the event to happen to look at where the problem is. Many interfaces cannot stand to have the processor stopped for a human to singlestep through to see what the problem is. The reasons for this not being possible can be the speci c timing of the interface or the timeouts built into the communication protocol. To avoid these issues, you could single-step both communicating devices or you could use the trace buffer in the PIC microcontroller to follow through what happened at a speci c point of time. I really like the trace buffer feature because it allows me to see exactly what has happened and I can identify very speci cally what the problem is and how it is manifested. When I make my proposed changes to the code to x the problem, I can run the changes through the trace buffer and see how the changes affect the operation of the application. Further enhancing your ability to observe problems are the logical analyzer and oscilloscope interfaces that are available on the front of the MPLAB ICE 2000. These connectors (which are not discernable in the photographs used for this section) allow you to either trigger the emulator s trace buffer remotely or use the complex triggering capability of the MPLAB ICE 2000 to trigger other pieces of test equipment. The connectors can be used for external devices to trigger the MPLAB-ICE 2000 to see what is happening in the code at a speci c external event. The last point about processor modules, device adapters, and transition sockets being available for every class of PIC microcontroller is important in order to understand exactly what I mean. As I have discussed elsewhere in the book, there are literally hundreds of different PIC microcontroller devices. To provide a processor module for each and every PIC microcontroller part number would be economically unfeasible for Microchip to produce, for distributors to keep in stock, and for you to buy. Instead, you should be looking for the supported device that best ts your requirements. As I write this, the supported devices include:
PIC12C5xx PIC12C67x PIC14000 PIC16C505 PIC16C52, PIC16C54, PIC16C55, PIC16C56, PIC16C57, and PIC16C58 PIC16C55x PIC16C62x PIC16C6x PIC16C6x2 PIC16F648A PIC16C71x, PIC16C72, PIC16C73A, and PIC16C74A PIC16C770, PIC16C PIC16C773, PIC16C774, and PIC16C777 PIC16F877
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