barcode reader in asp.net THE EMU-II in Software

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THE EMU-II
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Figure 5.12 This circuit should be implemented when using the MPLAB ICD 2 or an ICSP programmer with the PIC microcontroller in the application circuit.
application. After working through a few applications in which ICD is used to debug the hardware, I have come to the conclusion that this approach was in error. Sharing I/O pins, even through current-limiting resistors, is a dangerous practice and one in which it is dif cult to have a set of rules that will work in all applications. Similarly, care must be taken with PIC and system power and I have found it much less likely to have power problems if the PIC MCU is powered by the application rather than through the MPLAB ICD 2. The culmination of these rules is displayed in the schematic shown in Fig. 5.12 and will allow you to create a PIC microcontroller application that can be plugged into an MPLAB ICD 2 or an ICSP programmer at any time.
The EMU-II
When I rst heard about the (original) MPLAB ICD and PIC16F877 Flash self-write capabilities, I was quite excited as I thought there was a way to use these capabilities to make my own simple in-circuit emulator. In the rst edition of the book, I created a simple emulator (called the Emu), which stored a PIC microcontroller hex le in a serial EEPROM and executed this data using an instruction interpreter that I wrote. Unfortunately, the best operating speed this home-built emulator could do was 10,000 instructions per second, which was two orders of magnitude less than the execution speed of the PIC microcontroller in the application. To come up with a better emulator, I wanted to use the internal debug features of the PIC16F877 for my own emulator to see if I could improve upon the MPLAB ICD implementation and create a product I would be comfortable with. The nal result is de nitely not what I initially envisioned when I started the project, but it did turn into one of the most interesting applications in this book and something that I probably learned the most on.
EMULATORS AND DEBUGGERS
The execution options available to the Emu-II.
Even if you are not going to build this application, I urge you to read through it as there will be information you will nd interesting and useful. As well, I have provided some macros that could be useful in your own applications. The issues I had with MPLAB ICD that I wanted to improve upon were:
Slow response to reset and single-step The single breakpoint No way of changing the program counter from the MPLAB IDE interface
The resulting application worked similarly to the YAP-II in that I provided an intelligent RS-232 interface to a terminal emulator (as well as a Visual Basic front end) that is completely self contained. The commands available to the Emu-II are listed in Fig. 5.13. Like the YAP-II, the Emu-II runs at 1200 bps and takes applications as hex les. The maximum application size is up to 1,792 (0x0700) instructions. The EMU-II provides the same functions as higher cost emulators with the added features:
The EMU-II is not device or operating system speci c. Any PC, Mac, or worksta-
tion with a terminal emulator program and a serial port capable of running at 1200 bps can be used with the EMU-II. Pins 6 and 7 of PORTB are useable, allowing 18-pin PIC microcontroller MCU applications to be emulated and programmed directly into parts without having to debug on PORTC or splitting up the PORTB functions. Provisions for a built-in PIC microcontroller programmer are included in the application. Up to eight breakpoints can be speci ed during application execution.
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