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This is a useful table to remember when you are working on PIC applications, even if you aren t simply converting high level language source code by hand into PIC microcontroller assembly. Negation of the contents of a le register is accomplished by performing the two s complement operation. By de nition, this is done by inverting the contents of a register and then incrementing:
comf reg, f incf reg, f
BIT AND AND OR
If the contents to be negated are in the w register, there are a couple of tricks that can be used to carry this out. For mid-range devices, the sublw 0 instruction can be used:
sublw 0 ; w = 0 w ; = 0 + (w ^ 0x0FF) +1 ; = (w ^ 0x0ff) + 1 ; = -w
However, in low-end PIC microcontroller devices, there is a little trick you can use, and that is to add and subtract the w register contents with a register as shown below:
addwf Reg, w subwf Reg, w ; w = w + Reg ; w = Reg (w + Reg) ; = -w
Reg should be chosen from the le registers and not any of the hardware registers that may change between execution of the instructions.
Bit AND and OR
One of the most frustrating things to do is to respond based on the status of two bits. In the past, I found that I had to come up with some pretty funky code, only to feel like it was not good enough. To try and nd different ways of carrying out these tasks, I spent some time experimenting with two skip-on-bit-condition instructions. The two skip parameters are used in such a way that the rst one jumps to an instruction if a case is true, and the second jumps over the instruction if the second case is not true. To show how the double-skip-on-bit-condition instructions could be used, consider the example of setting a bit if two other bits are true (the result is the AND of two arbitrary bits). You could use the code
bcf Result btfss A goto Skip btfsc B bsf Result Skip: ; Assume A and C = 0 ; A = 0, don t set Result ; B = 0, don t set Result ; A = B = 1, set result
This code is quite complex and somewhat dif cult to understand. A further problem with it is that it can return after a different number of cycles depending on the state of A. If A is reset, the code will return after four instruction cycles. If it is set, six instruction cycles will pass before execution gets to Skip.
ASSEMBLY-LANGUAGE SOFTWARE TECHNIQUES
By combining the two tests, the following code could be used to provide the same function:
bsf Result btfsc A btfss B bcf Result ; ; ; ; Assume A = B = A == 0, Result B == 1, Result A == 0 or B == 1 = 0 = 1 0, Result = 0
This code is smaller, always executes in the same number of cycles, and is easier to work through and see what is happening. An OR function could be implemented similarly:
bcf Result btfss A btfsc B bsf Result ; ; ; ; Assume A = B = 0 A == 1, Result = 1 A == B == 0, Result = 0 A == 1 or B == 1, Result = 1
This trick of using two conditions to either skip to or skip over an instruction is useful in many cases. As I will show later in this chapter, this capability is used to implement constant-loop timing for 16-bit delay loops.
16-Bit Operations
As you start creating your own PIC microcontroller applications, you ll discover that 8 bits for data is often insuf cient for the task at hand. Instead, larger base values have to be used for saving and operating on data. In the appendices I present a number of snippets for accessing 16-bit data values, but in this section I want to introduce the concepts of declaring and accessing 16-bit (and greater) variables and constants. Declaring 16-bit variables in MPASM using the CBLOCK directive is quite simple. To declare a variable that is larger than 8 bits using CBLOCK, a colon (:) follows the variable name, and the number of bytes is speci ed afterward. For example, 8-, 16-, and 32-bit variables are declared in the PIC16F84 as
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