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TValue = TValue << 1 i = i + 1 endw movf Quotient + 1, w btfsc Quotient, 7 incf Quotient + 1, w movwf Quotient endm
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The divisor fraction is calculated at assembly time and used at assembly time to create the series of instructions for dividing a variable value by a constant. The macro will produce code that ranges from 39 to 81 instructions and takes the same number of instruction cycles to execute. This is only marginally larger than the analogous multiplication code. There are two concerns with this code. The rst is that if 1 is selected as the divisor, the code will return a quotient of 0. This is due to the fact that 0x010000 divided by 1 is 0x010000 and will not cause any of the loops to add the current value. A divisor Value of 1 could be checked in the macro and an error returned if this is a potential problem. The second problem is a bit more insidious and is re ective of how division algorithms work. The quotient returned is rounded to the nearest 1. In many applications requiring a division operation, this would not be acceptable instead, the quotient and remainder would have to be returned. This macro was written to round the value so that indicator operations (such as RPM in a tachometer) could be implemented quickly and ef ciently. The value returned from the divide macro should not be passed onto any other arithmetic functions to prevent the error in the result from being passed down the line. If the quotient were required for subsequent operations, I would suggest that you use either the 16-bit division routine presented in Appendix G. If this macro is to be used, then the entire 16-bit quotient calculated by this macro (the lower 8 bits being the fractional value less than 1) is passed along with the nal result divided by 256 (by lopping off the least signi cant byte).
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Delays are often critical aspects of an application. In PIC microcontroller applications, it is not unusual to have microsecond, millisecond, or even full-second delay routines built in. In the rst edition of this book I didn t do a very good job of explaining how to create useful delays and how they are used in applications. In this section I want to clear up the errors I made and help you to understand how adding delays to an application can make your life simpler, as well as help you to understand how critically timed application code works. The basic unit of timing in an application is the instruction cycle. The instruction clock rate is one-quarter the external clock frequency (as was explained earlier in this book). The reciprocal is the instruction cycle period. The instruction cycle period is found using the formula
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Instruction cycle = 4/clock frequency
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Thus, for a clock frequency of 3.58 MHz, the instruction cycle is found as
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Instruction cycle = 4/clock frequency = 4/3.58 MHz = 1.12 ms
Actual time delays should be converted into instruction cycle delays as quickly as possible. The formula I use for doing this is
Instruction Delay = Time Delay * clock frequency/4
For example, if you had a PIC microcontroller running at 10 MHz and wanted a 5-ms delay, the preceding formula would be used:
Instruction Delay = = = = = Time Delay * clock frequency/4 5 ms * 10 MHz/4 50 * (10 ** 3)/4 1.25 * (10 ** 4) 12,500
Thus, for a delay of 5 ms in a PIC microcontroller running at 10 MHz, 12,500 instruction cycles would have to execute. For a one-instruction delay, a nop instruction is used. For two cycles, the goto $ + 1 instruction is used. Four cycles can be implemented by calling a subroutine that simply returns. The two instructions take four instruction cycles to execute:
: call :
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