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The problems that I have outlined here are pretty common for applications you will nd in magazines and books and over the Internet. They are also problems that you will make for yourself as well when you develop your own applications. Along with nding other people s problems, this process for nding and debugging problems can be applied to modifying circuits and getting them working even if you have used different parts or have changed the source code. The purpose of this experiment has really been to show you that if you do encounter problems, you should be able to puzzle them out for yourself and x them without getting angry at the source or giving up on the project completely. Note that I could have thrown in a few more problems for you that I have discussed elsewhere in this chapter and this book. These problems include noninitialized variables and variables that are overlayed on hardware I/O registers. These problems are something else you will have to watch for when you are debugging an application that isn t working properly.
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PIC MICROCONTROLLER APPLICATION DESIGN AND HARDWARE INTERFACING
As I was creating the second edition of this book, I received an e-mail with an excellent suggestion: Write a chapter on how a reader could develop his or her own applications. This is something I haven t done in any of my previous books, and it is something that I am sure would be useful for many people who are new to PIC microcontroller programming and electronics. In this chapter I will introduce you to the aspects of developing PIC microcontroller applications, along with comments on what steps and roles I nd to be useful for me when I m designing my own PIC microcontroller applications and other engineering projects. Before going through the steps that I use to develop PIC microcontroller applications, there are a few words of advice I want to give you. First of all, document everything. Get into the habit of carrying a notebook around with you so that if you get an idea on how to do something, you can record it. Human memory is a pretty fallible storage device, and I ve spent many hours trying to remember that great idea I had the day before at lunch. Second, start small; I get a lot of e-mails from people who want to create a substantial project such as the Lego MindStorms and ask me where they should start. My reply is to get a book and gure out how to program the PIC microcontroller and learn how to be effective with it before starting to plan that killer application. A large project for any beginner will start off strong and then become bogged down as the project seems to drag on and on. I know of some people who rise to the occasion of developing large applications and become experts through them, but these people are few and far between. Next, don t settle on the rst method you come up with. There s always more than one way to do something. Take, for example, a ashing LED; using the PIC microcontroller, the following methods could be used:
1 Delay by code 2 Delay by timer and polling the timer 3 TMR0 interrupt delay with interrupt handler
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PIC MICROCONTROLLER APPLICATION DESIGN AND HARDWARE INTERFACING
Which method is best in your application Spending a few minutes thinking of options can make the application much easier later on. It is unfortunate, but I usually discover better methods for carrying out something after I nish an application. If I gure out a better way, I ll usually keep it in my notebook for the next time rather than go back and recreate the application. I may go back and change the application, but that is only if the change offers a substantial improvement to what was already there (i.e., the circuit costs less to build or can use a PIC microcontroller with a smaller program memory). The basic rule here is If it ain t broke, don t x it. Lastly, steal other people s ideas and methods. This does not mean stealing their code and circuit diagrams but instead understanding how their code, interfaces, and applications work and recreating them as they work best for you. Not only will this help you to avoid getting blocked, but the chances are that you also will learn from others and be able to use their ideas in ways that aren t readily apparent. An excellent resource for this is Rudolf Van Graf s Encyclopedia of Electronic Circuits (more information about this set of books is available in Appendix A). This series of books provides a large selection of circuits from virtually every facet of electronics. Other resources include the various monthly electronics magazines (also listed in Appendix A) because these will have at least one PIC microcontroller application per month. The Internet also has a plethora of circuits at various web sites. I just want to caution you not to believe everything that you read on the Internet because the information can be inaccurate. I ve also found a number of web pages that will offer a few free circuits as an inducement for you to buy design information from the sponsor or use the sponsor as a consultant.
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