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EFFECTIVE USER INTERFACING
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The only restriction to this routine is that neither the 50- or 60-ms routine can run for more than 10 ms, and combined the total execution time cannot be more than 10 ms. Ideally, no more than 9 ms should be the longest delay to ensure that there will be no problems when the code executes. Pins can seem like the devil in some applications; especially if built-in functions are used. My recommendations for allocating pins are to keep PORTA free for use as an analog input port or for simple digital I/Os and try to keep byte-wide functions on a PORT with no built-in I/O functions that are likely to be used. Allocating resources is really a part of the application requirements de nition process. As with the requirements de nition, you may want to repeat the resource allocations planning and work through any con icts or shortfalls. This may result in changing the application s requirements but in the long run will simplify the amount of work that has to be done to get the application working.
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Effective User Interfacing
At Celestica, I used to have to work with an environmental stress screening (ESS) chamber that has one of the most dif cult-to-use interfaces I have ever been exposed to. The microcontroller-driven LCD/push button interface is poor because the user is not prompted through the process of controlling or programming the ESS chamber. The interface does not give feedback with messages indicating the current operating mode and no prompting on how to jump to other operating modes. One of the biggest challenges is to actually gure out how to start the chamber operating (either in manual or automatic mode). Nobody approaches any of the chambers that have these controllers
PIC MICROCONTROLLER APPLICATION DESIGN AND HARDWARE INTERFACING
without an inch-thick manual. This is a real mystery to me because the interface has a 16-bit ASCII LCD display and six buttons that could be used for feedback and control functions. Creating a user interface that is going to be liked by the application users generally isn t that hard to do or expensive (especially when compared with the costs of thick paper manuals, web sites or returned sales). By following a few simple rules, you can come up with a user interface for your application that will make operation of the application intuitive and easy to use effectively by somebody with very little cost. The rst thing that you should do is to understand what kind of feedback is appropriate for the application. For example, an oxygen sensor in an automobile does not require a manned user interface, but an RS-232 interface may be appropriate for servicecenter maintenance. A burglar alarm circuit probably should have a light and a siren. A programmable microwave oven should have a keypad and LCD character display for setting the oven power level cooking time. When you are deciding the best way to interface to the user, remember that the user probably won t have a manual with him or her. If an operating mode has to be selected or data entered, the user will have to be guided through the process. This could be done in a manual, but manuals get lost. Keeping the operating instructions in the circuit will keep the dif culty of using the application to a minimum. In many order circuits, you will see that LEDs are used for this function. There are three problems with this method. The rst is that extra money is required to have the panel(s) laid out and manufactured. This means that you have extra stock, and if the functions change, you will have to change the panel, requiring that the design and layout costs have to be paid repeatedly. The second concern is that the panel above is in English only. If other languages have to be supported, then additional panels have to be designed and procured. This can be a headache when the products are con gured and shipped. By far the biggest concern with using LEDs in a panel like that above is that the user will have trouble guring out how to get to another mode or what to do next in the current mode. Unless a printed manual is included with the application, you will nd users who have trouble guring out how to work the application. Along with these problems, there are also the issues of labeling buttons and making sure that the labels are appropriate. A much better method is to use a LCD or other alphanumeric display not only to guide the user but also to give feedback on the device s operation. In the various protects presented in this book, I have a couple of examples using LCDs for data display and user interfacing. With an alphanumeric display, the software should support a menuing system with prompts. When I wrote PC Ph.D., I created a simple programmable ISA PIC microcontroller interface. This interface used a two-line LCD and two buttons to select whether or not a device was active and what address it works at (see Fig. 15.1). One button was used for selecting the parameter value, and the other was used for selecting the next menu. Solutions such as using a LCD probably seem expensive, but they should be compared with the cost of writing and printing manuals and designing and ordering custom panels. When the PIC microcontroller is connected to another device (or any two devices are wired together), there should be some kind of constant check (or ping ) to ensure that the link is active. If you look ahead, you will see that I go to considerable lengths to
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