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End PPortHiAuto Set Auto FDXT (Pin 14) to an // Electrical low 2 ) | 0x002 );
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PPortLoAuto( Int BaseAddr ) // { outp( BaseAddr } //
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End PPortLoAuto // // Set Strobe (Pin 1) to an Electrical High 2 ) & 0x0FE );
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PPortHiStrobe( Int BaseAddr ) { outp( BaseAddr } //
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End PPortHiStrobe // // Set Strobe (Pin 1) to an Electrical low 2 ) | 0x001 );
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PPortLoStrobe( Int BaseAddr ) { outp( BaseAddr } //
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End PPortLoStrobe
In status bit read routines, note that I have not included reads for bits that are driven in from the port. I assume that the control register latches are good and that the device connected to the port is not holding it high or low. Also, for the status bit read routines, the result returned is either 0 or 1 and inverted, if appropriate.
PRACTICAL PC INTERFACING
PPortRdBusy( Int BaseAddr ) // { return 1 ^ (( inp( BaseAddr } // End PPortRdBusy
Read the Busy (Pin 11) handshaking // line 1 ) & 0x080 ) >> 7 );
PPortRdError( Int BaseAddr ) { return 1 ^ (( inp( BaseAddr } // End PPortRdBusy
// Read the Printer Error (Pin 12) // handshaking line 1 ) & 0x020 ) >> 5 );
PPortRdSLCTO( Int BaseAddr ) { return 1 ^ (( inp( BaseAddr } // End PPortRdSLCTO
// //
Read the SLCT Out (Pin 13) handshaking line
1 ) & 0x010 ) >> 4 );
PPortRdAck( Int BaseAddr ) // { return ( inp( BaseAddr } // End PPortRdAck
Read the Ack (Pin 10) handshaking // line
1 ) & 0x008 ) >> 3;
With these routines, external digital hardware can be controlled by the 4 output bits driven to the parallel port, and data is either read from or written to, and an additional 4r input pins are available. Earlier in this chapter I went on at length about the modern operating systems and development tools; you cannot access individual registers, which means that these functions cannot be implemented in a modern system. There are two ways that you can get around this issue. The rst is to use an alternative application development system such as Cygwin, which was discussed at the start of this chapter. Another way is to connect a PSP-equipped PIC microcontroller to the PC s parallel port and print data to the MCU. This method isn t as audacious as it might rst appear. From your applications, data can be sent to the printer port device driver. The printer type is de ned as part of the system, and if the PIC microcontroller and PSP port were de ned as a basic printer, with the basic capabilities of taking in data and pulsing the _Busy and _Ack lines to simulate the basic printer, you could send data one way to the PIC microcontroller very ef ciently.
PIC MICROCONTROLLER APPLICATION BASICS
I m an experimenter by nature. As I work through computer and electronic projects, I ll often create small applications to understand a new microcontroller or to help clarify features in devices with which I already am familiar. In this chapter I will be going through many of the different aspects of the PIC microcontroller on an experimental basis to help you to understand how applications execute in the processor and how hardware interacts with the PIC microcontroller. At the end of each of these little applications you will have a piece of code and some knowledge that you can apply in your own applications. Remember that the three PIC microcontroller families have a great deal of commonality in architectures, instructions and how they execute. In the following sections I will concentrate on the mid-range PIC microcontroller architecture, but much of this code can be used throughout the other two architectures with, in the worst case, only minor modi cations. I recommend that you keep this commonality in mind when you are looking at other people s code and applications; something written for the low end often can be ported directly to the high end, and vice versa.
Jumping Around
Execution change is probably an area that you didn t expect that you would have to learn with the PIC microcontroller. In most processors, the jump instructions and their operation are quite straightforward and usually do not require the additional support of the PIC microcontroller. Most processors have conditional jump instructions and jump instructions that can execute anywhere in the processor s instruction space. The PIC microcontroller instructions work at a much lower level than those of many other processors. From the perspective of conditional jumping, there are no speci c instructions for executing a jump based on STATUS register contents, but there is the mechanism to
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