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Setup PortB
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Now, Execute the Program ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; Return Here every Execution Check the Least Signi cant Bit of PORTB Now, Shift over the state Variable Add the Least Signi cant Bit of Jump to the Correct State Execution Vector
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Loop: movlw 1 andwf PORTB, w movwf Temp bcf STATUS, C rlf state, w addwf Temp, w ; PORTB addwf PCL, f goto State0 goto State0 goto State10 goto State11 goto State2 goto State2 ; State Routines...
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PIC MICROCONTROLLER APPLICATION BASICS
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State0: incf i, f movlw 4 subwf i, w btfsc STATUS, C incf state, f ; Variable goto Loop State10: ; it s == 0 movlw 1 addwf PORTB, f goto Loop
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Increment i to 4
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; ; ; ;
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is i greater than 3 Yes, Increment the State Execute the State value again Increment the LSB of PORTB if
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State11: ; Carry Set bcf STATUS, C rlf PORTB, f btfsc STATUS, C incf state, f goto Loop
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Shift Over PORTB by one until
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Is the Carry Set Yes, Go to the Next State
State2: clrf I clrf state goto Loop
; Reset Everything and Restart the ; Program
I realize that StateMC is a pretty simple example of a state machine, but it does show how the state is changed with different conditions and the program progresses forward. I realize that this application may not seem so simple especially considering that some of the operations and execution will be quite unexpected. In fact, this can be a problem with state machines the operation becomes even more confusing as you modify the application over time and see simple changes that can be made. In StateMC, an example of this would be how I increment and shift the output value in PortB when there are other ways of doing this (that are not quite so complex). State machines are particularly useful in low-end PIC microcontrollers, where the twolevel stack may be a hindrance in traditional programming methods.
SOME BASIC FUNCTIONS
Some Basic Functions
Compared with the latest 64-bit processors, the PIC microcontrollers described in this book are extremely simple. Despite this relative simplicity, there are many different ways in which they operate, and there are some quirks to be aware of. In the following sections I want to introduce you to some of these behaviors to make you aware of them as well as give you a better idea of how the PIC microcontroller operates. I m sure that when you rst started working with PIC microcontrollers, you were amazed at their complexity, but as you gain more experience with them, they will start to seem simpler, and you will be able to create applications much faster and with much fewer errors.
CALCULATING CURRENT REQUIREMENTS/CHECKING EXPERIMENTALLY
In an application, if I know the voltage applied to the circuit and the current being drawn by it, I can go back and determine the power being used by the circuit using the formula Power V I
Earlier in the book I stated that I didn t think that my PIC microcontroller current estimations would be very accurate and that when I was developing the power-supply speci cation for the application, I derate the calculated current value by 25 to 100 percent. In this experiment I want to check how useful this derating value is and whether or not I can predict accurately how much current the application really requires. When I look at the PIC16F84 datasheet, I can see that at 4 MHz and the XT oscillator speci ed, the PIC microcontroller requires a typical intrinsic current of 1.8 mA and a maximum intrinsic current of 4.5 mA. This means that when the light-emitting diode (LED) is off (no current owing through it), I would expect to see anywhere from 1.8 to 4.5 mA owing through the circuit. When the LED is turned on, the current passing through the PIC microcontroller will be increased by the current that is being sunk through the LED. For my typical LED circuits, I assume that the LED has a voltage drop of 0.7 V (the same as any silicon diode) with a maximum current of 20 mA. To provide this current, I have placed a 220current-limiting resistor in series with the LED. The 220- resistor was chosen by using Kirchoff s law, which states that the voltage applied to a circuit is equal to the voltage drops within it. If 5.0 V is applied to the circuit and the LED has a voltage drop of 0.7 V, then the resistor has 4.3 V across it. Knowing that the LED must have a maximum of 20 mA owing through it, I used Ohm s law to calculate the resistance: R V/I 4.3 V/20 mA 215
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