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addlw 0x00E Character movwf PWMOn btfss goto goto PWM $ - 1 Loop
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The PWM signal-generating code in the interrupt handler can be described using the following pseudocode:
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Interrupt PWMOutput() { // // // // When Timer Over ows, Toggle On and Off and Reset Timer to correct delay for Value
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if (PWM == ON) { // If PWM is ON, Turn it off and Set Timer PWM = off; // Value TMR0 = PWMPeriod PWMOn; } else { // If PWM is off, Turn it ON and Set Timer PWM = ON; // Value TMR0 = PWMOn; } // INTCON.T0IF = 0; } // // Reset Interrupts
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End PWMOutput TMR0 Interrupt Handler
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This operation rst outputs a high on the PWM pin for the speci ed number of TMR0 ticks (up to 250). When TMR0 over ows and requests an interrupt, the PWM pin is set to low, and TMR0 is loaded with the number of ticks remaining for the 250-instructioncycle PWM signal period. Generation of the TMR0 initial value is somewhat unusual and may be somewhat dif cult to follow. I suggest that you go back to the Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) I/O section of Chap. 17 to see how the add and two subtracts works for loading TMR0 with the correct value.
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1) Ch 1
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The LED PWM waveform.
I would recommend that you rst build rst and try out this application before reading on. When you run the application, you should see the LED connected to RB0 increase in brightness to a certain point and then turn off and start again. The entire process takes about 1 second. If you were to look at the PWM signal sent to the LED, you would see something like Fig. 20.30 transitioning to a high or low value with short pulses. A mostly low signal will translate to the LED being very bright. It probably will be surprising to you to discover that the most dif cult code that I had to write for the experiment was the code used for updating PWMOn (which is used to select the PWM signal s pulse width). When I created this application originally, I wanted to simply decrement the PWMOn variable to make the off time of the output PWM signal longer as time goes on, which, in turn, makes the LED brighter as time goes on. To do this, I originally wanted to use code that can be shown as the following pseudocode:
while (1 == 1) { while (PWM == ON); PWMOn = PWMOn 1; while (PWM == off); } // elihw // // // // Loop Forever Wait for Pulse to Finish Decrement the Pulse Width Wait for the Off to Finish
I/O WITH INTERRUPTS
which simply waits for an interval between pulses in which the PWMOn value could be changed. The following assembly-language code was created for this function:
Loop: btfsc goto decf btfss goto goto PWM $ - 1 PWMOn, f PWM $ - 1 Loop ; ; Return here forever Loop while PWM == ON
Decrement the Pulse Width Loop while PWM == off
Loop Again
When I simulated the application, the output seemed to be correct for 10 ms (the length of time I simulated the operation for 10 PWM pulses). When I programmed a PIC microcontroller and tried out the application, I found that the LED ashed brie y on power-up and then stayed dark. When I put an oscilloscope probe on the LED, I found that the PWM signal was high with a few short pulses. I then simulated the application beyond the rst 10 ms and discovered that when the value put into TMR0 was very high (i.e., 0xFF), a new interrupt request from TMR0 would be received before the interrupt handler had returned to the mainline (Loop) code. Execution jumped immediately back into the interrupt handler and changed the polarity of the PWM output pin without giving the mainline code a chance to recognize the change. To x this, I then monitored the values of PWMOn and made sure that it never became less than 0x0C, at which point PWMOn was reset to 0xF4 to restart itself. This change to the code did x the problem, but the LED ashed on and off very quickly (about four times per second). To make the display a bit more user-friendly, I decided to use a 16-bit counter for the PWMOn value (this is PWMDouble) and shift it down to slow down the actual PWM display. I found that I had to do this twice (divide the value by 4) to get an appropriate value. After PWMDouble is divided by 4, I check the range and reset the output to a high value to make the full on time a bit longer. You can see the results of this code in the Loop section at the end of the LedPWM application. This was not the best way to change PWMOn. Along with being quite complex, requiring three additional le registers for temporary values, it also took me a long time to gure out exactly what should be the values for the range check and reset for the code. A much better way would have been simply to wait 4 ms (the time for four pulses to be output) and then change PWMOn. This method would not require the range checking of the method that I used because the updates do not depend on the changes in the PWM bit. The code for implementing the changing PWM using the method of simply delaying by 4 ms is
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