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When I wrote the rst edition of this book, I wanted to provide a good range of sample applications for readers to work through and use as the bases of their own applications. With this goal in mind, I presented the applications as introductions to the PIC microcontroller and different interfacing methods. This actually was quite a big miscalculation on my part. It turned out that most readers wanted to build the applications just as they were. The limited circuit information caused problems for a number of readers who did not have experience in designing their own PIC microcontroller applications and felt like I did not provide enough information to help them wire the applications. To remedy this, I have provided full schematics for each project along with pointers in the downloaded information as to where the code can be found. I am also pleased to offer twice as many sample applications as were present in the original book. To help you sort through them, I have grouped them according to the PIC microcontroller family to which they belong, and each project has its own HTML page with links to the source code and other pertinent information. In previous books, people have had problems deciphering schematics, so I have included postscript versions of the schematics for download as well. The projects themselves are generally quite simple and are designed to be built and debugged in the space of a weekend. I have designed the different projects to use a variety of control, display, and power-supply methods. As I describe them, I will point out their pros and cons, as well as discuss their suitability for other applications.
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As I ve gained insight and expertise into working with the different PIC microcontroller devices, I ve found that there are many people using the PIC microcontroller architecture families in applications that are inappropriate for their capabilities. Nowhere is this more obvious than in regard to how low-end devices are used. Most of the published
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Copyright 2008, 2002, 1997 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Click here for terms of use.
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applications that I see in magazines and journals use low-end devices in applications for which I consider them poorly suited. As I indicated earlier in this book, I consider low-end devices best suited for applications that have the following characteristics:
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This does not mean that sophisticated applications cannot be implemented with the low-end PIC microcontrollers, just that the code cannot be very long or require interfaces that are best suited for interrupts or the peripherals of mid-range devices. I have targeted the example low-end applications in this chapter to use the 12C5xx and 16C505 PIC microcontrollers, which are very low cost (under a dollar each in reasonably low quantities) and do not require external clocks or reset. TrainCtl: MODEL TRAIN TRAFFIC LIGHT CONTROL USING A HALL-EFFECT SENSOR As my kids have gotten older, I have been reintroduced to many of the hobbies and toys that I had when I was young. Many of these activities have changed in ways that would have been unimaginable for me as a kid 30 years ago; for example, Hot Wheels cars can be bought with computer chips inside them. If you are buying stuffed toys for babies and toddlers, you will discover that just about all of them have electronic chips inside them to provide light and sound. Finally, remote-control aircraft were something that cost $500 or more and required a signi cant level of skill when I was young; today, remote-control aircraft can be purchased for $30 or less. Despite this, I was disappointed to nd that model trains are virtually unchanged from when I was a kid, with many of the products available today being identical to what I had 30 years ago. This statement is not quite true; there is the DCC protocol, which allows digital commands to be broadcast on the rails to engines, rolling stock, switches, and accessories. A starter-set DCC is very expensive and can be very dif cult ( ddly is the word I hear most often) to set up and use. What I would like to come up with is a computer-controlled system that is somewhere between the two. The exibility of a computer system should be able to be added to the train system for relatively low cost and relatively simply. The project presented here is one of the rst of my experiments toward this type of system. It uses the 18-V ac auxiliary power supply built into most electric train systems to power the circuitry as well as the traf c lights that are controlled by it. The prototype circuit is shown in Fig. 21.1. The circuit shown in Fig. 21.2 draws power from the model train ac power and controls the operation of the three traf c lights through the use of TRIACS. I have to caution you very strongly that while the techniques for determining component values could be used for developing applications that control household mains wiring, the component values cannot be used with 110 120- or 220-V ac household power currents. You should not attempt to use the information contained in this project if you are the
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