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An oscilloscope view of the TV IR remote-control receiver output.
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length of time before the next bit Synch. The IR robot is designed for Sony TV remotes, which have 12 data bits and a 40-kHz carrier. The timings are listed in Table 21.9 (and use a base timing T of 550 s). To read the incoming signal, I used the following state machine code in an interrupt handler that differentiated between TMR0 over ows and PORTB change on interrupt:
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interrupt IRTankInt() { if (INTCON.T0IF != 0) { // TMR0 Over ow Timeout Indicating Invalid // Data Being Received // Handle Incoming IR Serial Data
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TABLE 21.9 FEATURE
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SONY IR REMOTE-CONTROL TIMING T TIMING ACTUAL LENGTH
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Leader Synch pulse 0 1
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4T T T 2T
2.20 ms 0.55 ms 0.55 ms 1.10 ms
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BitCount = 0; State = 0; INTCON = 1 << RBIE; Interrupt Request } else { Temp = PORTB; Reset
Prepare for the Next Packet
// // // //
Wait for Change on PORTB Also Reset T0IF Else, Handle Incoming Bit Transition Save the Changed State in PORTB to
// Interrupt Request INTCON = (1 << RBIE) + (1 <<T0IE); // Reset and Enable TMR0 and RB Interrupts switch(State) { // Handle PORTB Change Based on Current State case 0: // Expect Leader/Synch Coming In TMR0 = 5msec; Put in Timeout State = State + 1; Value = 0; break; case 1: TMR0 = 1 msec; for 0.55 msec BitCount = 12; State = State + 1; break; case 2: TMR0 = 2 msec; State = State + 1; break; case 3: Value = Value >> 1; // Bit Ended - Use TMR0 to Get Value // Start of Synch Bit - Come back here for // Each One // Low Value can be valid for 1.10 msec // // End of Leader/Get Synch High Synch Pulse is Valid // Haven t received anything yet // Leader Valid for 2.2 msec
Expect twelve Incoming Bits
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If (TMR0 < 0.8 msec) Value.msb = 1; // If Less than 0.80 msec has passed, then // 1 was received BitCount = BitCount 1; if (BitCount == 0) { DataFlag = 1 // Flag Mainline that Data is Available INTCON = 1 << RBIE; } } // end Switch } // end if } // End IRTankInt
This code has the advantage of being able to discriminate between different manufacturers IR codes (the differences lay in the length of time during the transitions, the number of bits, and the IR carrier frequency). As I said earlier, one of the features I didn t like about the magazine article robot was its use of a single IR receiver. I was concerned that this would not provide adequate reception in a crowded room where the robot could be turned in different directions relative to the remote control. For my robot, I decided to use two IR receivers pointing 180 degrees apart (this can be seen in the gure; the IR receivers are the two square metal cans at the front of the robot). This gives almost 360-degree coverage. By doing this, a new problem came up, and that was the problem of arbitration. I found that one receiver may not pick up the transmitted signal or that it would be a 40-kHz cycle or two ahead or behind the other receiver. The arbitration scheme used is quite simple. The rst receiver to transmit the leader to the PIC microcontroller is the one that is listened to for the remainder of the data packet. The application code can be found in the code\IRTank folder. The application has been updated from the first edition s code to use a PIC16F84 instead of a PIC16C84. Irtank.asm was based on Test9A from the rst edition. This was the last application in the series of programs written to understand how TV remote controls work and then build up the understanding into the nal application. One thing that I am proud of in this application code is that when I created it, I had nothing like an oscilloscope to debug it. I was able to gure out the actual times by writing simple applications that mapped out signal timing, and I was able to differentiate the codes that were being sent. Once I had enough information to understand how the remote control worked, I was able to write the application. The IR receiver the code was developed using a LiteOn 40-kHz IR remote control receiver module (Digi-Key Part Number LT1060-ND). This receiver was connected up to a PIC microcontroller that had a number of LEDs on PORTB/PORTA to try to decode what was happening. Since the original version of the robot was created, many different
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